Doha Debates– Don't settle for a Divided World
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Artificial Intelligence

Robots and artificial intelligence aren’t just rising — they’re here, reshaping our digital landscape. AI is revolutionizing highways, hospitals and homes, from driverless cars to automated medical devices and delivery drones. The rewards are promising, but at what cost? And who’s left out?

8 lessons

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

DD-Asks-AI
play
03:29
video

Doha Debates Asks: Would You Trust a Computer With Ethical Decisions?

We hit the streets of three major tech hubs around the world to ask people a few questions about AI.

Essential questions:

  1. What do you think when you hear AI?
  2. Can computers have consciousness?
  3. Would you trust a computer to make important ethical decisions?
  4. If most jobs were automated, would the world be better or worse off?
  5. Are there jobs AI can’t do?
  6. If AI develops far enough, will machines deserve rights too?

Lesson 2: A Brief History of AI

ai history_1
play
07:22
video

A Brief History of Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) promises to help facilitate and improve our lives — but experts warn there are many risks in ceding decision-making to computers.

Doha Debates Correspondent Nelufar Hedayat breaks down a brief history of artificial intelligence.

Essential questions

1. How do people interact with AI? When was the idea of AI first created? What are the different types of AI?

2. What is the roll of big data?

3. Will AI become more intelligent than humans?

4. Are there ethical, moral, or privacy issues with AI? What are the issues with facial recognition?

Lesson 3: The Trolley Problem - Ethics & AI

DD-AI-thetrolleyproblem
play
01:12
video

Can A.I. Solve The Trolley Problem?

The trolley problem is a thought experiment in ethics — but developers and ethicists are revisiting it as society considers the future of artificial intelligence.

Essential questions

  1. Is it possible for a computer to make an ethical or moral decision?
  2. Should AI by used in a courtroom?
  3. With regard to job creation, should companies invest more resources in AI or in people?
  4. Is AI a risk to basic human rights? How do governments use AI?

Lesson 4a: Speaker Muthoni Wanyoike

DD-AI-MuthoniWanyoike-statement
play
04:24
video

Muthoni Wanyoike: AI Promises Equality Among Nations

Listen to Muthoni detail her view that we should approach AI with mindful optimism and highlight opportunities presented by AI that will improve the quality of our lives.

Muthoni argues that AI has the potential to make great progress in how we solve some of humanity's biggest problems and can help us use more eco-friendly energy sources, optimize transportation and address poverty.

Muthoni Wanyoike is a data scientist from Nairobi, Kenya, and co-founder of Nairobi’s Women in Machine Learning and Data Science.

Essential questions

  1. What role will AI play on the continent of Africa?
  2. How might AI help save wildlife and find poachers?
  3. How might AI help lift farmers out of poverty?
  4. Will AI improve customer service?

Lesson 4b: Speaker Dex Torricke-Barton

DD-AI-Dex-Torricke-Barton-statement
play
05:30
video

Dex Torricke-Barton: Tech Literacy for Lawmakers

Listen to Dex make his case that governments and institutions must adapt to the future of AI to harness its power for humanity in the long run.

The challenge, according to Dex, is that lawmakers need more tech literacy and are making a huge mistake by expecting tech companies to solve every ethical dilemma without collaboration. Tech companies and pioneers should work in partnership with policymakers and the public, Dex says.

Dex Torricke-Barton is director at the Brunswick Group in London, and a former communications executive at Facebook, Google and SpaceX.

Essential questions

  1. How might AI solve world problems?
  2. What can people in positions of power do with regard to AI?
  3. Why is it important for people in the technology fields to work with policy makers?
  4. At what level should politicians understand AI?
  5. Is AI good, evil, or just a tool to be used?

Lesson 4c: Speaker Nick Bostrom

DD-AI-NickBostrom-statement
play
06:38
video

Nick Bostrom: A.I. Could Destroy Humanity

Listen to Nick Bostrom outline his view that AI has near-term benefits but extreme long-term risks: It could destroy humanity as we know it. Nick sees a fast-approaching transition to an era of machine intelligence that will amplify human abilities in most fields.

But in the long run, Nick believes, the development of human-level artificial general intelligence and superintelligence could bend the trajectory of life and might be the last invention we ever make.

Nick Bostrom is director of Oxford University’s Future of Humanity Institute, and the author of the bestselling book “Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies.”

Essential questions

  1. If progress in AI is rapid, what might it lead to?
  2. Why is it important to look at AI from the short term and long term perspectives?
  3. What might be the impact of AI super intelligence developing?
  4. Is it possible to stop AI development and progress?
  5. Would someone be willing to take a stand on the issue of AI?

Lesson 4d: for Speaker Joy Buolamwini

DD-JoyBouolamini-statement
play
05:29
video

Joy Buolamwini: AI Face Recognition May Amplify Inequality

Listen to Joy outline her view that AI’s potential must be tempered with the acknowledgment that AI magnifies the flaws of its makers. It can reflect the biases of its creators and amplify discrimination, she argues.

Joy believes that without regulation and public oversight, AI can compound the social inequalities that its advocates hope to overcome.

Joy Buolamwini is a computer scientist and digital activist at the MIT Media Lab, and founder of the Algorithmic Justice League.

Essential questions

  1. How might people be overconfident and underprepared for AI?
  2. How might AI create inequality?
  3. What areas in AI are there shortcomings in its development?
  4. In what ways are there biases and “coded gaze” found in AI?
  5. How will people outside of the tech world have a say in AI development?

Lesson 5: Connector

ai_govinda clayton intro
play
03:21
video

Dr. Govinda Clayton: Exploring the Common Themes of A.I.

Listen to Govinda build consensus between the speakers’ sharply differing views and raise questions inspired by their positions.

Given the speakers' agreement that AI is here to stay and will continue to grow exponentially, how can we best manage its risks and maximize its benefits? Where are the areas of convergence and points of disagreement on the role of regulation and public oversight?

Govinda Clayton is a senior researcher in peace processes at the Center for Security Studies at ETH Zurich, and a world expert in negotiation and mediation.

Essential questions

1. What is a Majlis?

2. Is AI here and will it continue to grow?

3. How should AI be regulated?

4. What are the time horizons regarding AI both in the short and long term?

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

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Artificial Intelligence

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Guide to using Doha Debates curriculum

Doha Debates curriculum may be used in a variety of ways. Each section will have an associated individual lesson plan.

It is possible to use one lesson plan of your choice, the lesson plan(s) that best fit your timeframe. However, this complete and comprehensive curriculum packet is designed to build on the previous sections and lessons.
The curriculum will focus around engaging students through the following techniques:

  1. Active learning
  2. Collaborative learning
  3. Discussions
  4. Increasing student motivation and participation
  5. Problem-based learning
  6. Use of effective questions
  7. Writing assignments

 

All of the lesson plans have at least one form of student engagement related to the lesson. Content can be tailored to most subjects.

Specific time allotments are outlined on the next page and will be found in each lesson plan within the Learning Plan section. You may use any part of the Learning Plan components.

 

FOR EDUCATORS
Artificial Intelligence

Complete Curriculum for Artificial Intelligence

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Guide to using Doha Debates Curriculum

Doha Debates curriculum may be used in a variety of ways. Each section will have an associated individual lesson plan. It is possible to use one lesson plan of your choice, the lesson plan(s) that best fit your timeframe. However, this complete and comprehensive curriculum packet is designed to build on the previous sections and lessons.

The curriculum will focus around engaging students through the following techniques:

  1. Active learning
  2. Collaborative learning
  3. Discussions
  4. Increasing student motivation and participation
  5. Problem-based learning
  6. Use of effective questions
  7. Writing assignments

All of the lesson plans have at least one form of student engagement related to the lesson. Content can be tailored to most subjects.

Specific time allotments are outlined on the next page and will be found in each lesson plan within the Learning Plan section. You may use any part of the Learning Plan components.

Content themes & timeframe

The following is a timeframe and content overview of the different sections included in this curriculum pack:

 

Lesson 1 – Artificial Intelligence: Doha Debates Asks

In classroom: 25 to 45 mins

Outside classroom: 1 day for each activity

 

Essential questions from Lesson 1

  • What do you think of when you hear AI?
  • Can computers have consciousness?
  • Would you trust a computer to make important ethical decisions?
  • If most jobs were automated, would the world be better or worse?
  • Are there jobs AI can’t do?
  • If AI develops far enough, will machines deserve rights too?

 

Lesson 2 – A Brief History of AI

In classroom: 50 mins to 1hr 10 mins

Outside classroom: 1 day first activity, 1 day+ for second activity

 

Essential questions from Lesson 2

  • How do people interact with AI?
  • When was the idea of AI first created?
  • What are the different types of AI?
  • What is the roll of big data?
  • Will AI become more intelligent than humans?
  • Are there ethical, moral, or privacy issues with AI?
  • What are the issues with facial recognition?

 

Lesson 3 – The Trolly Problem / Ethics & AI

In classroom: 1hr 40 mins to 2hr 50 mins and 1 to 2 days for part 7

Outside classroom: 1 day first activity, 1 day+ for second activity

Videos in this lesson/collection may be used individually or as a series within the context of the section.

 

Essential Questions from Lesson 3

  • Is it possible for a computer to make an ethical or moral decision? (The Trolly Problem)
  • Should AI be used in the courtroom? (Algorithmic (in)justice: What you need to know)
  • Should companies invest more resources in AI or people with regard to who does the job. (The Future of Jobs)
  • Is AI a risk to basic human rights? (AI: The New Arms Race)
  • How do governments use AI? (AI: The Future of life and death decisions)

 

Lessons 4a to 4d – Speaker Highlights

In classroom: 1hr 5 minutes to 2hr 50 mins (per speaker)

Outside classroom: 1 to 2 days+ (per speaker)

Students will watch episodes for each speaker. This section has individual lesson plans for each speaker. Lesson plans follow the same format for each speaker but allow for a deeper analysis of each speaker by focusing on each one individually.

 

Speakers

  • Muthoni Wanyoike
  • Dex Torricke-Barton
  • Nick Bostrom
  • Joy Buolamwini

 

Lesson 5 – The Connector

in classroom: 30mins to 45mins plus 1 day

Outside classroom: Variable timeframe at the discretion of the teacher

This lesson ties all previous lessons together.

 

Essential Questions from Lesson 5

  • What is a Majlis?
  • Common themes of topic

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

Stage 1: Desired Goals

Established goal

Students will hear differing views on Artificial Intelligence based on the Doha Debates video: Artificial Intelligence: Doha Debates Asks.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • AI comes in many forms
  • AI is still in its early phases of use and development
  • People view AI in a variety of ways

 

Essential questions

  • What do you think when you hear AI?
  • Can computers have consciousness?
  • Would you trust a computer to make important ethical decisions?
  • If most jobs were automated, would the world be better or worse off?
  • Are there jobs AI can’t do?
  • If AI develops far enough, will machines deserve rights too?

 

Acquisition

Students will know…

  • Different ways AI is used
  • Opinions their peers have about AI

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize different uses of AI
  • Express how other people see the use of AI

 

Engagement

Students will..

  • Understand where other people think AI is used in daily life.
  • Keep track of the student’s daily use of AI

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Use the scale created in class to judge each of the essential questions.
  • Oral or written response to the essential questions. Explanation of how each student
  • arrives at his or her view.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In classroom learning

5-10 minutes

Write the words “Artificial Intelligence” on the board and ask students what first comes to mind.

 

5-10 minutes

Create a list of where AI is found.

 

10-15 minutes

Ask each of the essential questions in small groups or as a class.

 

5-10 minutes

Create a scale of some type, such as numbers 1 to 10, for later use in judging the essential questions and the importance, danger, or viability of the questions.

 

Outside of classroom learning (choose one or more activities)

one day

Ask 5 people outside of the classroom to make a list of where each person believes AI is found.

 

one day +

Keep track and create a list of all AI use for 1 day (or any number of days depending on teacher choice).

Lesson 2: A Brief History of AI

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Students will have a basic understanding of Artificial Intelligence and related issues to AI based on the Doha Debates video: A Brief History of AI

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand…

  • The different types of AI
  • That AI is found in a variety of settings and situations
  • People rely on AI in formats that are not always obvious

 

Essential questions

  • How do people interact with AI?
  • When was the idea of AI first created?
  • What are the different types of AI?
  • What is the roll of big data?
  • Will AI become more intelligent than humans?
  • Are there ethical, moral, or privacy issues with AI? What are the issues with facial recognition?

 

Acquisition

Students will know…

  • Key facts and dates about the origin of AI Who Alan Turing is and his connection to AI

Students will be able to…

  • Explain the origins of AI
  • Articulate where the student stands on issues related to AI use e.g. jobs, courtrooms, end of life decisions.

 

Engagement

Students will..

  • Understand where other people stand on the essential questions
  • Understand in greater detail the accumulation of personal data

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Students will do the activity The Intelligent Piece of Paper (on pages 9-10)
  • Students will write a reflection piece at the end of the lesson on his or her current understanding of AI
  • Oral or written responses to Essential Questions

Stage 3: Learning plan

In classroom learning

15-20 minutes

Do the attached activity: The Intelligent Piece of Paper (follows)

 

20-30 minutes

Next move on to the Essential Questions. The questions may be discussed in a small group first and then as a whole class.

 

15-20 minutes

Students will write a brief reflection piece on their current understanding of AI through the Essential Questions.

 

In classroom learning (next day)

10-15 minutes

Share the responses from the “outside classroom activity” once the information has been collected.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss any results from the outside classroom activity #2.

 

Outside of classroom learning (choose one or more activities):

one day

Ask three other people outside of school the Essential Questions.

one day +

Attempt to acquire personal data collected by at least 3 different websites that collect data on you e.g. Facebook, Snapchat, Tiktok, or any other type of social media site.

 

The intelligent piece of paper

Created by Paul Curzon, Queen Mary University of London follows.

The intelligent piece of paper

Created by Paul Curzon, Queen Mary University of London

 

Age group successfully used with

8 – adult

 

Abilities assumed

Answering general questions, knowledge of game of noughts and crosses / Tic-tac-toe

 

Time

around 15 minutes, though can be used to start a longer workshop activity

 

Size of group

anything from 2 to hundreds

 

Focus

What is a program?
What is intelligence and could a computer ever be intelligent?

 

Summary

Hold a competition between an artificial intelligence: a “highly intelligent piece of paper” and a human. In this ongoing challenge between the best of humanity and the best of paper-kind the paper has an unbeaten record. It is yet to lose a game of noughts and crosses.

 

Aims

This activity aims to introduce the topic of what a computer program is and how everything computers do simply involves following instructions written by (creative) computer programmers.

It also aims to start a discussion about what intelligence is and whether something that just blindly follows rules can be considered intelligent.

 

Techical terms

Computer program, programming language, Artificial Intelligence, programmer, peripherals

 

Materials

  • A whiteboard or flip chart to write on so all can see 2 flip chart / whiteboard pens
  • A copy of the intelligent piece of paper (possibly laminated)
  • A musical greeting card that plays some appropriately horrible song recognizable by the age group. (optional)

 

What to do

The Grab: Announce that the piece of paper you are holding is more intelligent than anyone in the room (even the highly intelligent teachers there). Wax lyrical about how intelligent it is without saying why. Wave it around keeping the written side hidden from the audience.

 

The Set-up: Ask the audience if they believe you and have a show of hands first of those who believe it is intelligent and then those who “believe I am talking total garbage and no way just a piece of paper could be intelligent”.

Usually most will go for the garbage option. Congratulate them on their wisdom (both for believing such a wise person as you and especially those that don’t – after all no good scientist believes claims of random people making great pronouncements however great they are without some evidence.

Ask them to bear with you for a while – perhaps it is intelligent, perhaps not, but ask for suggestions of what might it be about the paper that could be the basis of such an outrageous claim.

You may get suggestions such as it is something special about the ink, or that it is laminated. If things like the former, praise them for an interesting idea but ask how that exactly might make it intelligent. If the latter, explain that the plastic covering is not the special thing – it is just there to protect the paper as it does not like you fingering it all the time. Another common suggestion is that there is a computer embedded in it. This is an opportunity to bring out a musical greeting card that plays some irritating music (and is intelligent enough to know to do it on your birthday) and explain it works via an embedded chip. You may want to mention that such a chip is as complex as the embedded computer used to put Neil Armstrong on the moon). Note by saying your paper could do it that way but you haven’t.

Another suggestion will be that it is what is written on the card. Ask what might be written that would make paper intelligent. Great equations? Wonderful poetry? Exciting facts? Suggest examples and ask if the audience think that would be intelligent. If not we need to look for something more Talk about the fact that knowledge isn’t the same as intelligence – and that they surely don’t just try to memorise things for exams but try to understand which isn’t the same. Agree that writing such things wouldn’t be enough for it to be intelligent.

Point out that to convince us that it is intelligent it must be able to do something to show that intelligence. What can the paper do? Well it has never lost a game of Noughts and Crosses (and it plays regularly against humans). Remind them that the game should end in a draw if both players play perfectly. You cannot force a win. Despite that, the paper has won about half the games it has played against humans like themselves, and drawn the rest. It is a perfect intelligence. Humans aren’t.

Ask them if they believe you or do they want to see some evidence? To show the
evidence you will need two volunteers.

 

The activity: Draw a noughts and crosses board on the whiteboard/flip chart. Give each volunteer a pen. Explain that to see how intelligent the paper is you will need to play a game of Noughts and Crosses. It will not be a battle between two humans but between paperkind and humankind. The paper is ‘peripherally challenged’
– you didn’t bring it a robotic arm or camera system (computer peripherals) so it needs a servant to do its bidding. You might want to note that just because someone is paralysed doesn’t mean they aren’t more intelligent than you.

One person will therefore play for the piece of paper. Their job is to just do what they are told by the paper. They must switch off their highly intelligent brain and do exactly as they are commanded: we don’t want to know how well they play the game just the paper. They should just read out loud the paper’s instructions (so everyone
can tell it is the paper playing not them) and do as it tells them.

 

The other player is there to represent the best of humanity. It may be best not to pick someone who was really keen and appearing to think they would never lose to do this to reduce the chances of it being a drawn game (though often such volunteers still
lose). Their job is to use all their intelligence to play as well as they can. As the paper is so intelligent, to make it fairer, say they can get help from the audience if they need it. Tell the audience to shout out if they think a mistake is being made or know the move to make.
Now get the person playing for the paper to read its instruction (about going first – comment that it is quite clever of it to want to go first). If someone complains about it being unfair it going first, point out that the game should just end in a draw. Going second isn’t a reason to lose.

The paper’s servant should then read out the first move and make the move – playing in a corner. Over to the human. There may be lots of shouts about different places to go. If the person is ensure encourage them to go where they think best of the options shouted. Continue like this, making sure the reader does read out and follow exactly the instruction and helping they understand where they are being told to go if need be and. For example opposite corner, means the diagonally opposite corner – this can later lea to a discussion of why special programming languages are needed – to be precise about what is needed.

Sometimes after the second or third move people in the audience will declare the game lost. Point out humanity does often resign at this point. Remind them it is only a piece of paper though. It might just have been lucky this far so might still mess up and not see what they can see.

If the paper has forked them, then often the player will then jokingly cheat, such as drawing to 0s. Point out that humanity often resorts to cheating at this point, and make them play properly, reminding them it is only paper and may still go wrong.
Either the paper will win or it will be a draw (if the human realises they need to go on the side not corners). If the latter then remind you that was predicted but that even so it was still clever of it to not let the human win. Announce that once more it has kept its unbeaten run. Say you’ll accept that perhaps it’s not more intelligent than the humans but it has shown itself to be their equal. If the paper wins announce that yet again the paper has shown itself more intelligent than humanity and that you have shown them the evidence asked for. Either way ask for applause both for the volunteers as they return to their seats and the paper for its stunning performance.

 

The explanation: Point out they asked for evidence and you have given it. Ask again for a show of hands as to who now believes the paper is intelligent and who believes you are talking garbage and paper can’t be intelligent. Usually everyone now is sure it
isn’t intelligent, despite the evidence of its abilities.

Point out that it did show intelligent behaviour so there is intelligence somewhere. Where is it? Someone will almost certainly say it is in the person that wrote the instructions. Ask if everyone agrees that that is where the intelligence is and get a show of hands.
Now explain that on the paper is essentially a computer program: instructions to be blindly followed. Everything they have ever seen a computer do, it was just blindly following instructions in the same way. Point out that if they are saying the paper just by being only rules isn’t intelligent then they are saying no computer could ever be intelligent.

These instructions were written in a language so that a human can follow them. If they were to be written for a computer they would be written in a programming language: just a language a computer can understand and so follow. Point out that if they think that it is the writer of the instructions who is the creative intelligent one, then they are saying that computer programmers are intelligent and creative (which is true). It is computer programmers who have written all the instructions all those computers are following.

 

I am a highly intelligent piece of paper. Let’s play noughts and crosses

I am X… and I go first…

 

Move 1:

Go in a corner.

 

Move 2:

IF the other player did not go there THEN go in the opposite corner to move 1. ELSE go in a free corner.

 

Move 3:

IF there are 2 Xs and a space in a line THEN go in that space.

ELSE IF there are 2 Os and a space in a line THEN go in that space.

ELSE go in a free corner.

 

Move 4:

IF there are 2 Xs and a space in a line

THEN go in that space.

ELSE IF there are 2 Os and a space in a line THEN go in that space.

ELSE go in a free corner.

 

Move 5:

Go in the free space.

Lesson 3: The Trolley Problem – Ethics & AI

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Students will identify areas artificial intelligence is used and describe the moral and ethical issues presented by The Ethics & AI video collection.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand…

  • The issues presented by AI from an ethical, moral, and privacy standpoint.
  • AI’s possible impact on jobs.
  • AI’s possible impact on the judicial system. AI’s use by governments.

 

Essential questions

  • Is it possible for a computer to make an ethical or moral decision?
  • Should AI by used in a courtroom?
  • With regard to job creation, should companies invest more resources in AI or in people?
  • Is AI a risk to basic human rights? How do governments use AI?

 

Acquisition

Students will know…

  • Key facts about how governments use AI.
  • Where they stand on how AI is used in different circumstances.

Students will be able to…

  • Explain how AI is used different situations.
  • Articulate where they stand on issues related to AI use, e.g.: jobs, courtrooms, end of life decisions.

 

Engagement

Students will…

  • Understand how other people view the Trolley Problem and Moral Machine.
    See how AI is used in a business setting.

Stage 2: Evidence & Assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Students will go through each Doha Debate video and discuss the related problems.
  • In groups, students will present additional research relevant to each video topic, either in oral form or through a brief PowerPoint.
  • Students will complete oral or written responses to the primary Essential Questions associated with each video, as well as complete any additional associated tasks.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In classroom learning

Each of the following may be used as a stand-alone lesson.

 

15-30 minutes

Start with Essential Questions. The questions may be discussed in small group first and then as a whole class.

 

15-30 minutes

Show The Trolley Problem video and discuss as a class. Essential Question: Is it possible for a computer to make an ethical or moral decision?

Do MIT’s Moral Machine problem and then discuss.

 

20-40 minutes

Show Algorithmic (in)justice: What you need to know video and discuss as a class. Essential Question: Should AI be used in the courtroom?

Read & discuss the National Law Review’s Would You Trust An Artificially-Intelligent Expert?

Read & discuss American Bar Association’s A ‘principled’ artificial intelligence could improve justice.

 

15-20 minutes

Show The Future of Jobs video and discuss as a class. Essential Question: With regard to job creation, should companies invest more resources in AI or in people?

Make a list of jobs that will be lost or not lost to AI.

 

15-20 minutes

Show AI: The New Arms Race and discuss as a class. Essential Question: Is AI a risk to basic human rights?

Make a list of the positive and negative aspects of AI.

 

20-30 minutes

Show AI: The Future of Life and Death Decisions and discuss as a class. Essential Question: How do governments use AI?

Read & discuss AMA’s Journal of Ethics Ethical Dimensions of Using Artificial Intelligence in Health Care.

 

1 – 2 days

Groups will do additional background research on each of the videos, then present their findings to the whole class.

 

Outside of classroom learning (choose one or more activities):

one day

Show the Trolley Video and Moral Machine to 3 to 5 people outside of school. Write down each person’s answer to the problems posed.

 

one day +

Visit a business that uses AI to learn more about how it functions for them. Then present your findings to the class.

Lesson 4a: Speaker Muthoni Wanyoike

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Articulate the role that artificial intelligence will play in creating more equity in Africa.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand…

  • How AI will be used in Africa.
  • Why AI is important to the speaker, based on the videos and background information provided.
  • How AI is used to protect animals in Africa. How AI is used to help farmers.

 

Essential questions

  • What role will AI play on the continent of Africa?
  • How might AI help save wildlife and find poachers?
  • How might AI help lift farmers out of poverty?
  • Will AI improve customer service?

 

Acquisitions

Students will know…

  • Key facts about AI use in Africa.
  • The role AI will play in the future development of Africa in a variety of ways.

Students will be able to…

  • Identify the main ideas of the speaker.
  • Express their findings orally and in writing.

 

Engagement

Students will…

  • Articulate how farmers use AI in Africa.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Students will write a summary of the speaker’s general position on AI based on the video and background content provided.
  • Groups will present research and answers to Essential Questions posed by the speaker.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In classroom learning

15 minutes

Watch the Muthoni’s Doha Debate presentation and the Speaker Spotlight segment. Make note of key points from these episodes.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content (page #) to develop a deeper understanding of the speaker.

 

5-10 minutes

In small groups, discuss what each person identified as key points from the videos and background information.

 

10-20 minutes

As a class, discuss each group’s findings.

 

15-20 minutes

In groups, pick one of the speaker’s Essential Questions. Then research and present answers and describe additional supporting data.

 

Outside of classroom learning

1 -2 days +

Students will research a specific organization or farmer in Africa that is currently benefiting from AI. Students will try to make direct contact with that organization or farmer to better understand how AI helps them. This may be done as a small group project. An example of a company using AI is Agrix Technology.

Background info: Muthoni Wanyoike

About Muthoni Wanyoike

Muthoni is a Programme Officer at Code for Africa’s Storylab Academy which is working with African journalists and technologists to improve digital storytelling through the use of data and digital resources.

She is a team leader at InstaDeep, an AI startup; an organizing committee member of Deep Learning Indaba, a conference focused on AI and emerging technology; and a co-organizer of the Nairobi Women in Machine Learning and Data Science community.

Muthoni is passionate about empowering and creating opportunities for women. Through the Nairobi Women in Machine Learning community, she is creating opportunities for women to network, learn from each other, and grow their data science careers. As a WiDS ambassador, she believes in creating a strong community network of women in data science to learn, engage and inspire.

 

Muthoni’s key points from Doha Debates presentation

  • Africa is a powerhouse of the future
  • The importance of mindful optimism
  • AI is improving quality of life in Africa
  • AI is tracking elephants to help better know where poachers may be found
  • The benefits of cellphones
  • The organization InstaDeep which is an AI startup AI brings opportunity
  • The three keys of AI in Africa:
  1. Helping save wildlife
  2. Lifting farmers out of poverty
  3. Improving customer service

 

Articles

The Future of Data Science and AI is Promising
read on Techweez.com

ART + AI – Generating African Masks using (Tensorflow and TPUs) read on towardsdatascience.com

12 meetups later, here’s 10 invaluable lessons we’ve learned on building a tech community. read on towardsdatascience.com

Deep dive into digital security and privacy for journalists. read on Medium

Fake News: 12 tools for sifting the truth. read on Medium

Practical Tactics to fight misinformation for Journalists on Twitter. read on Medium

 

Videos

Applications of AI, ML and Data Science in Kenya.
watch on Youtube

Nairobi Women in Machine Learning and Data Science.
watch on Facebook

 

Other

Follow on Medium

Podcast: AI Corporations and Communities in Africa with Karim Beguir & Muthoni Wanyoike

Lesson 4b: Speaker Dex Torricke-Barton

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Articulate the importance of people in positions of power, such as politicians, understanding AI.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • AI is still in its infancy
  • People in technology fields need to work with policy makers and politicians
  • AI is a not itself good or evil but simply a tool
  • Who should be making decisions about AI development

 

Essential questions

  • How might AI solve world problems?
  • What can people in positions of power do with regard to AI?
  • Why is it important for people in the technology fields to work with policy makers?
  • At what level should politicians understand AI?
  • Is AI good, evil, or just a tool to be used?

 

Acquisition

Students will know…

  • Some people are not staying calm about the development of AI
  • Key players in AI development

Students will be able to…

  • Identify the need to have people in power better understand AI
  • Express their views on who should help regulate AI development

 

Engagement

Students will..

  • Engage with politicians to learn what they know about AI
  • Engage with a person in the technology sector to learn what people in the field believe is the roll of politicians

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / performance tasks

  • Write a summary of the speaker’s general position on AI based on the video and background content
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the Essential Questions presented by the speaker

Stage 3: Learning plan

In classroom learning

15 minutes

Watch the Dex’s Doha Debate presentation and the Speaker Spotlight segment. Make note of key points from these episodes.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker. (page #)

 

5-10 minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class.

 

15-20 minutes

Groups will pick one of the Essential Questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

Outside of classroom learning

 

1-2 days +

Students, either independently or in small groups, will talk with a politician about their understanding of AI. The student(s) will develop a set of 3 to 5 questions about AI to ask the individual. The politician may be at any level of government.

 

Outside of classroom learning

1 day

Students, either independently or in small groups, will talk with someone in the Technology field about their personal view on the role of politicians regarding AI. The student(s) will develop a set of 3 to 5 questions about AI to ask the individual.

Background info: Dex Torricke-Barton

About Dex Torricke-Barton

Dex has more than a decade of experience advising some of the world’s most influential leaders and organizations on CEO communications and reputational management, thought leadership and strategic communications.

After beginning his career as speechwriter and spokesperson for the office of United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon from 2008-10, Dex joined Google as the company’s first executive speechwriter, where he supported Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, CEO Larry Page and other senior leaders. From 2012-16, Dex led executive communications at Facebook, where he managed communications for Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg. Subsequently, he led communications for Elon Musk at SpaceX.

Before joining Brunswick in July 2018, Dex served as an independent strategic communications adviser for major tech companies, US and UK political leaders. He is a frequent public speaker on issues around global connectivity and emerging technologies, and a New York Times-bestselling ghostwriter. He holds an MPhil in Russian & East European Studies from the University of Oxford, and a BA in Politics & East European
Studies from University College London.

 

Dex’s key points from Doha Debates presentation

  • AI is still in its infancy. It is more parrot like.
  • Some people aren’t staying calm about AI such as those who believe in “killer robots”.
  • AI won’t solve world problems. That takes people in positions of power.
  • Tech people need to work with policy makers.
  • Politicians are often bad at making policy decisions about technology.
  • Who should actually be making decisions about AI development?
  • Politicians need to understand the technology about which they speak.
  • AI is a tool, not good or evil.

 

Articles

Facebook is a force for good. read on HuffPo

I’m a Legal Immigrant and I Welcome the President’s Action on Immigration read on HuffPo

The Technology of Peace. read on HuffPo

Our Responsibility of Afghanistan. read on HuffPo

We don’t know how to stop Iran. read on HuffPo

The failure of the Green Movement. read on HuffPo

SpaceX exec quits to fight Trump ‘nightmare’ read on CNN Money

Want to Resist Trump or Make America Great Again? These People Switched Careers. read on NYTimes

 

Videos

How the internet is uniting the world. TedxTalks on youtube

A Global Generation. youtube

No Ban No Walls in San Francisco. youtube

The Impact of Technology Sesame Summit 2019. youtube

 

Other

Twitter

Instagram

Lesson 4c: Speaker Nick Brostrom

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Explain the importance of the short and long term views of AI development.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand…

  • The possible issues with continued progress in AI development
  • What near term benefits come from AI
  • The possible impact of AI replicating human intelligence
  • It is difficult to stop progress

 

Essential questions

  • If progress in AI is rapid, what might it lead to?
  • Why is it important to look at AI from the short term and long term perspectives?
  • What might be the impact of AI super intelligence developing?
  • Is it possible to stop AI development and progress?
  • Would someone be willing to take a stand on the issue of AI?

 

Acquisitions

Students will know…

  • The possible existential risk associated with AI
  • What mechanized super intelligence means in the long term

Students will be able to…

  • Identify the need to have people in power better understand AI
  • Express their views on who should help regulate AI development

 

Engagement

Students will..

  • Understand concerns with AI development

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Write a summary of the speaker’s general position on AI based on the video and background content
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker

Stage 3: Learning plan

In classroom learning

15 minutes

Watch Nick’s Doha Debate presentation. Make note of key points from this video.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker. (provided at end of document)

 

5-10 minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the video and background information as key areas.

 

5-10 minutes

Review An Open Letter: Research Priorities for Robust and Beneficial Artificial Intelligence. Discuss who would or would not be willing to sign it and why.

 

10-20 minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class.

 

15-20 minutes

Groups will pick one of the essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

Outside of classroom learning

1 -2 days+

Students (individually or in groups) will interview 5 to 10 people about concerns about AI development currently and in the future. The information will be brought back to the classroom to share with the class.

Background info: Nick Brostrom

About Nick Brostrom

Nick Bostrom is Swedish-born philosopher and polymath with a background in theoretical physics, computational neuroscience, logic, and artificial intelligence, as well as philosophy. He is Professor at Oxford University, where he leads the Future of Humanity Institute as its founding director. (The FHI is a multidisciplinary university research center; it is also home to the Center for the Governance of Artificial Intelligence and to teams working on AI safety, biosecurity, macrostrategy, and various other technology or foundational questions.)

He is the author of some 200 publications, including Anthropic Bias (2002), Global Catastrophic Risks (2008), Human Enhancement (2009), and Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies (2014), a New York Times bestseller which helped spark a global conversation about artificial intelligence. Bostrom’s widely influential work, which traverses philosophy, science, ethics, and technology, has illuminated the links between our present actions and long-term global outcomes, thereby casting a new light on the human condition.

 

Nick’s key points from Doha Debates presentation

  • If progess continues to be rapid, what might it lead to?
  • The importance of looking at AI in the short term and long term.
  • The vast benefits of AI in the short term.
  • The long term view of AI should consider the possible replication of human intellengince.
  • How might mechanized super intelligence chance or even challenage humans?
  • The long term existential risks of AI.
  • It is important to realize it isn’t possible to stop progress.

 

Articles

Artificial intelligence: ‘We’re like children playing with a bomb.’ read on The Guardian

Philosopher Hadn’t Seen “The Matrix” Before Publishing Simulation Hypothesis. read on Futurism.com

Nick Bostrom has over 200 publications. For additional articles please see Nick Bostrom’s personal website for selected papers on Ethics and Policy, Risk and the Future, Anthropics and Probablity, Technology Issues, Transhumanism, and the Philosphy of the
Mind. In additional there are Interviews and other miscellanous content.

 

Videos

Sam Harris and Nick Bostrom – Pulling a Black Ball from the Urn of Invention. youtube

Prof. Nick Bostrom – Artificial Intelligence Will be The Greatest Revolution in History. youtube

Nick Bostrom: “Superintelligence” | Talks at Google youtube

What happens when our computers get smarter than we are? | TED Talks youtube

The Future of Machine Intelligence – Nick Bostrom, at USI youtube

The Perfect Human Being Series E17 – Nick Bostrom on superintelligence youtube

Why we love doomsday scenarios youtube

Lesson 4d: for Speaker Joy Buolamwini

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Explain how, without oversight, AI will amplify inequality and bias within AI.

 

Meaning

Students will understand…

  • The various ways AI is unchecked, unregulated, and unwanted
  • How AI has problems with current facial recognition technology
  • The importance of justice and inclusion in AI development
  • What the benefits of the Safe-Face Pledge and its use

 

Essential questions

  • How might people be overconfident and underprepared for AI?
  • How might AI create inequality?
  • What areas in AI are there shortcomings in its development?
  • In what ways are there biases and “coded gaze” found in AI?
  • How will people outside of the tech world have a say in AI development?

 

Acquisition

Students will know…

  • Key areas where the “coded gaze” is found in AI
  • The need for additional input around AI from people outside of the technology world

 

Students will be able to…

  • Explain where inequality and biases are found in AI
  • Recognize how AI may magnify the flaws of its makers

 

Engagement

Students will..

  • Understand various ways bias and inequality are found in AI.

Background info: Joy Buolamwini

About Joy Buolamwini

Joy Buolamwini is a poet of code, computer scientist, and digital activist who uses art and research to illuminate the shortcomings of artificial intelligence. She founded the Algorithmic Justice League to create a world with more ethical technology. Her TED Featured Talk on algorithmic bias has over 1 million views. Her MIT thesis methodology uncovered large racial and gender bias in AI services from companies like Microsoft, IBM, and Amazon. In addition to advising elected officials during US congressional hearings, she serves on the Global Tech Panelto advise world leaders and executives on reducing AI harms.

Joy has written op-eds on the impact of AI for publications like TIME Magazine and New York Times. Her spoken word visual audit “AI, Ain’t I A Woman'” which shows AI failures on the faces of iconic women like Serena Williams, Oprah Winfrey, and Michelle Obama has been part of exhibitions ranging from Ars Electronica to the Barbican Centre, UK. A Rhodes Scholar and Fulbright Fellow, Joy has been named to notable lists including theBloomberg50, Forbes Top 50 Women in Tech (youngest), and Fortune Magazine (40under40) named her “the conscience of the AI revolution”. She holds graduate degrees from Oxford University and MIT; and a bachelor’s from the Georgia Institute of Technology. As a former pole vaulter, she still holds Olympic aspirations if not realities.

 

Joy’s key points from Doha Debates presentation

  • People are overconfident and unprepared as AI develops.
  • There is a risk of abuse and bias with AI.There are times where AI is unchecked, unregulated, and unwanted.
  • The role of inequality within AI.
  • AI magnifies the flaws of its makers.
  • The is an issue of “coded gaze” with AI.
  • Dealing with AI’s shortcomings.
  • AI programs not recongnizing black faces or other faces of color.
  • The problems with the explotation of the data wealth of the global south.
  • The roll of data colonalism.The Safe-Face Pledge.
  • The importance of having a say in how AI is used.
  • The need for justice and inclusion with the development of AI.

 

Articles

An MIT researcher who analyzed facial recognition software found eliminating bias in AI is a matter of priorities.’ read on Business Insider

Halt the use of facial-recognition technology until it is regulated read on Nature.com

Artificial Intelligence Has a Problem With Gender and Racial Bias. Here’s How to Solve It read on TIME

Amazon Is Pushing Facial Technology That a Study Says Could Be Biased read on NYTimes

 

Videos

Algorithic Justice thirteen.org

The Government Is Using the Most Vulnerable People to Test Facial Recognition Software slate.com

The Coded Gaze: Unmasking Algorithmic Bias youtube

How I’m fighting bias in algorithms | TED Talks youtube

Compassion through Computation: Fighting Algorithmic Bias youtube

Code4Rights, Code4All youtube

Handle AI with care! Like fire, it is dangerous but has its uses youtube

 

Other

Twitter

Instagram

Medium

Personal Website

Lesson 5: Connector

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goals

  • Explain the meaning and role of the Majlis.
  • Describe and articulate the connections between differing views on AI.
  • Express the themes discussed by the Connector.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand…

  • There a variety of views regarding AI.
  • AI is a technology that will be part of the student’s future.
  • There are areas of consensus that are found regarding AI.
  • It is necessary to get clarity on issues where individuals do not agree.

 

Essential questions

  • What is a Majlis?
  • Is AI here and will it continue to grow?
  • How should AI be regulated?
  • What are the time horizons regarding AI both in the short and long term?

 

Acquisition

Students will know…

  • Key facts about how AI is viewed within different contexts and settings.
  • How AI is seen in different cultural settings.
  • The importance of resolving conflict over issues such as AI.

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize differing views on AI.
  • Express personal stance regarding AI.
  • Use research skills to find information to support the student’s view on AI.

 

Engagement

Students will..

  • Use what they have learned to engage in new ways with AI.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Find data to support one of the three themes discussed by the Connector in groups which will then be presented to the class.
  • Write a final paper on where the student stands on AI with supporting resources and evidence.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In classroom learning

5 minutes

Read about the majlis being part of UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage.

 

5-10 minutes

Read “How a majlis can open minds and shape our perspectives.”

 

5-10 minutes

Watch the Connector video. The second half of the full debate may be used to hear additional comments from each presenter.

 

one day

The class is split into three groups. Each group is given one of the common themes discussed in the Connector video. The group will find information that supports and refutes the specific theme. The three themes are as follows:

  1. AI is here and will continue to grow.
  2. The regulation of AI.
  3. The time horizons of AI both in the short term and long term.

The class will come together to discuss the three common themes based on the information that each group has found. This discussion will follow the majlis format.

 

15 – 20 minutes

The class may watch additional sections of the full Doha Debate to listen to what each speaker talks about during the majlis.

 

15 – 20 minutes

The class will create an agreed upon conclusion or possible solutions related to the issues presented about AI.

 

10 minutes

A brief discussion on possible additional topics that might fit the majlis format.

 

one day +

Each student will write a final paper on where the student now stands on the issue of Artificial Intelligence.

 

Outside of classroom learning

Variable time

Students will keep a journal for the rest of the semester to keep track of all the ways they engage with AI outside of the classroom. This may be used for a larger discussion near the end of the semester.

Relative participants:

Muthoni Wanyoike
Kenyan data scientist
Dex Torricke-Barton
British communications executive
Nick Bostrom
Swedish Philosopher, Author and director of Oxford University’s Future of Humanity Institute