Doha Debates– Don't settle for a Divided World
course

Globalization

Global threats are growing fast, from climate change and nuclear weapons to the spread of infectious disease and job loss from automation.

7 lessons

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

GLOBALIZATION_DDASKS
play
04:27
video

Doha Debates Asks: Does Globalization Make Life Easier?

Where do you think most of the products you buy come from? We hit the streets of a few major cities to ask people their thoughts globalization.

Essential questions

  1. Do you think globalization makes your life easier? Where do you think most of the products you buy come from?
  2. Do you think people should be able to work and live in any country?
  3. Do you think borders are more helpful or harmful? Can you name three issues that can only be tackled globally?
  4. Why is it hard for countries to tackle problems together?
  5. What does being a global citizen mean to you?

Lesson 2: Your Phone Is a Product of Globalization

GLOBALIZATION EXPLAINER
play
09:30
video

Your Phone Is a Product of Globalization

"The world is evermore connected—and at the same time, distrust and division is also on the rise."

Doha Debates Correspondent Nelufar Hedayat breaks down the current state of globalization.

Essential questions

  1. What is globalization?
  2. Who has helped develop the technology in smartphones?
  3. Where do the materials for a smartphone come from?
  4. How has globalization affected poverty in countries like China?
  5. What is the free trade?
  6. What type of changes have happened because of globalization?
  7. Why is distrust and division on the rise?

Lesson 3: Are all passports created equal? And Other Short Videos

world without borders
play
05:08
video

Artea: Envisioning a World Without Borders

Refugees and migrants from around the world have found a home in Artea, Spain, a community that has helped newcomers rebuild their lives.

Essential questions

  1. Are all passports created equal?
  2. What are possible ways to incorporate refugees into a new place instead of pushing them away?
  3. How involved should one country become in another country’s affairs?
  4. How can people in “unseen” communities create visibility?

Lesson 4a: Speaker Parag Khanna

globalization_parag_opening remarks
play
06:11
video

Parag Khanna: Globalization Reduces Poverty For Billions of People

Listen to Parag Khanna make his case that the negative consequences of globalization can be attributed to insufficient regulation and that globalization, when managed well, is beneficial to society.

Parag points to poverty reduction for billions across the world and global wealth creation as evidence that globalization has ultimately been a force for good. Negative effects of globalization like inequality and environmental degradation cannot be blamed on globalization itself, Parag argues, but on leaders that are failing to effectively manage their economic systems.

Essential questions

  1. How old is globalization?
  2. Does globalization help reduce poverty?
  3. Which is worse, too little trade or unfair trade?
  4. Why is infrastructure investment important for globalization?
  5. What role does government play in globalization?
  6. Is inequality a product of globalization or of politics?
  7. How might globalization help with education?

Lesson 4b: Speaker Medea Benjamin

globalization_medea_ss
play
10:21
video

Speaker Spotlight: Medea Benjamin

Listen to Medea Benjamin detail her view that we can be global thinkers and resist the influence of large corporations in globalization.

Medea believes the downfalls of globalization can be attributed to the immense power afforded to corporations in shaping our increasingly globalized world. Our future lies, she argues, in thinking of ourselves as global citizens while uplifting local economies instead of vast, corporate-driven ones.

Essential questions

  1. Is it possible to live in a borderless world?
  2. How has globalization wreaked havoc as an economic system?
  3. What are the costs of cheap products?
  4. What are the environmental impacts of globalization?
  5. How might globalization be undemocratic and unfair?
  6. How does globalization play out at the local level?
  7. What might be a simple way to for an individual to have a global impact?

Lesson 4c: Speaker Sisonke Msimang

globalization_sisonke_opening remarks
play
06:17
video

Sisonke Msimang: The Jargon of Globalization Talks

Listen to Sisonke Msimang’s thoughts on the importance of honest conversations about globalization and not getting lost in abstract language.

Sisonke argues that opposition to globalization is oftentimes a way to disguise racism, pointing to the growing hatred and fear of migrants in wealthy countries that by and large have benefited from economic globalization. To more adequately address globalization, Sisonke says, we must reject the term “globalization” itself and start taking action, both politically and locally, to change what we do not like about our world.

Essential questions

  1. Does it matter where you live?
  2. Is globalization used to stir up hatred and to blame others such as foreigners?
  3. Are conversations about globalization in wealthy countries really about race and multiculturalism?
  4. Why do some poor countries reject globalization?
  5. What are reasons people are anti-globalization?
  6. What are reasons people are pro-globalization?
  7. How might local politics have a global impact?

Lesson 5: Connector

how to get along
play
03:55
video

How to Get Along With Other People

Dr. Govinda Clayton sat down with Doha Debates to explain how to make the most out of tough conversations and the secret to getting along with others.

Essential questions

  1. What is a Majlis?
  2. Is inequality a political choice?
  3. Is there too much “globalese” being thrown around?
  4. How does Us vs. Them play into how globalization is viewed?
  5. Are citizens directing their anger about globalization in the right direction?
  6. Does activism still make a difference in the direction globalization is going?

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

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Globalization

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Guide to using Doha Debates curriculum

Doha Debates curriculum may be used in a variety of ways. Each section will have an associated individual lesson plan.

It is possible to use one lesson plan of your choice, the lesson plan(s) that best fit your timeframe. However, this complete and comprehensive curriculum packet is designed to build on the previous sections and lessons.
The curriculum will focus around engaging students through the following techniques:

  1. Active learning
  2. Collaborative learning
  3. Discussions
  4. Increasing student motivation and participation
  5. Problem-based learning
  6. Use of effective questions
  7. Writing assignments

 

All of the lesson plans have at least one form of student engagement related to the lesson. Content can be tailored to most subjects.

Specific time allotments are outlined on the next page and will be found in each lesson plan within the Learning Plan section. You may use any part of the Learning Plan components.

 

FOR EDUCATORS
Globalization

Complete Curriculum for Globalization

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

Flexible instruction

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Know where people stand on a variety of questions regarding globalization. Students will hear differing views on globalization from the video Globalization: Doha Debates Asks.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • There is not a single definition for the term “globalization”
  • People view globalization in a variety of ways
  • Globalization is not controlled by one government or organization
  • People often think of China as the primary source of global production and goods

 

Essential questions

  • Do you think globalization makes your life easier? Where do you think most of the products you buy come from?
  • Do you think people should be able to work and live in any country?
  • Do you think borders are more helpful or harmful? Can you name three issues that can only be tackled globally?
  • Why is it hard for countries to tackle problems together?
  • What does being a global citizen mean to you?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Different issues associated with globalization
  • Opinions their peers have about globalization

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize the personal views of globalization
  • Express how other people see the issues associated with globalization

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Understand what other people think about globalization through direct discussion
  • Describe how a selected item is “global”

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Oral or written response to the essential questions
  • Explanation of how each students arrives at his or her view

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

5-10 minutes

Discuss what comes to mind when you hear the word “globalization”.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions in small groups.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions as a class.

 

5 minutes

Watch the video Globalization: Doha Debates Asks.

 

10-15 minutes

Focus on the question, “Can you name three ways COVID-19 could be tackled from a global perspective?”

Create a list of responses and then change the question “to what cannot be tackled and why?”

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

Ask three to five people outside of your class/learning group four of the essential questions. The data may be collected in person or virtually. Write each person’s responses to share as a class/group.
Each student will find one item they think is the most “global.”

 

15-20 minutes

Share the responses from the first activity once the information has been collected.

 

15-20 minutes

Each student will share their chosen item and why they think it is the most “global.”

Lesson 2

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Students will have a basic understanding of globalization and key issues based on the Doha Debates video: Globalization Through The Lens Of Your Phone

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • There are positive and negative aspects to globalization.
  • Some people do and do not benefit from globalization.
  • Globalization creates opportunities but not equally across the world.
  • One item like a smart phone is a globally, not locally, produced item.

 

Essential questions

  • What is globalization?
  • Who has helped develop the technology in smartphones?
  • Where do the materials for a smartphone come from?
  • How has globalization affected poverty in countries like China?
  • What is the free trade?
  • What type of changes have happened because of globalization?
  • Why is distrust and division on the rise?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key connections through globalization
  • Methods of movement with globalization of goods and services

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize issues associated with globalization
  • Express problems related to the spread of globalization

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Understand other people’s general knowledge about
    globalization
  • Understand certain items are “global” products

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Oral or written response to the essential questions
  • Explanation of how each students arrives at his or her view
  • Data collection from other people outside of the classroom regarding globalization

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

10 minutes

Watch the Doha Debates video: Globalization Through The Lens Of Your Phone.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions in small groups and then as a class or discuss the questions as a class only.

 

15-20 minutes

View globalization data on Our World in Data. Select any five tables or graphs on which to focus as a class/group.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

Ask 5 people outside of the classroom the essential questions from this lesson. Answers may be collected in-person or virtually. Information will be brought back to class or virtual learning group for evaluation and discussion.

Choose two to three items from your home and attempt to determine where the different parts of the item originate and where the item is manufactured.

 

The next three activities may be completed during the next class meeting.

10-15 minutes

Discuss the results collected from asking the essential questions.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the items selected from the student’s home.

 

20-30 minutes

Do the simulation, International Trade Game. This may be done in class or virtually through online video gathering.

Lesson 3 - Are all passports created equal? and other short videos

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Establish a foundation of primary issues that globalization presents in different ways and in different settings.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Passports provide a service that is not always equal
  • Refugees face difficulties in new communities for a variety of reasons
  • A country does not always deliver equal access to resources
  • People within a country may be “invisible” or “unseen” for a number of different reasons

 

Essential questions

  • Are all passports created equal?
  • What are possible ways to incorporate refugees into a new place instead of pushing them away?
  • How involved should one country become in another country’s affairs?
  • How can people in “unseen” communities create visibility?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key facts about the various ways globalization impacts people’s lives
  • Different ways people handle and deal with how globalization affects day-to- day life

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize the various conditions in which inequality is found because of globalization
  • Express how globalization impacts people in different ways around the world

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Describe the experience of a person who is homeless through an interview if possible
  • Describe the experience of a person 18 or younger who is (or was) a refugee

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Students will watch short videos and discuss additional problems presented in each
  • Students will form groups to find additional evidence for each of videos shown
  • The additional evidence found will be presented to the class/learning group either in oral form or through a brief visual presentation
  • Completion of associated tasks with each video Oral or written response to the essential questions
  • Explanation of how each students arrives their view

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

15-30 minutes

Start with essential questions. The questions may be discussed in a small group first and then as a whole class/learning group.

 

10-15 minutes

Watch Artea and discuss. Essential Question: What are possible ways to incorporate refugees into a new place instead of pushing them away?

 

5-10 minutes

Watch What a Passport Says About Your Privilege and discuss. Essential Question: Are all passports equal?

 

10-15 minutes

Watch Uighur Refugees: Will I See My Family Again? and discuss. Essential Question: How involved should one country become in another country’s affairs?

 

5-10 minutes

Watch Putting A Kenyan Community on the Map and discuss. Essential Question: How can people in “unseen” communities create visibility?

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

Thinking about “unseen” communities – how does the United States deal with homeless people? Are there any homeless people in your community? Create a map of where homeless people live. If here are no homeless people where you live, find out how homeless people are counted and provided services in cities like New York or San Francisco. Create a set of 3 to 5 questions to research. Write a brief analysis of the collected data.

Interview a person who is (or was) a refugee under the age 18 about their experience. Create a set of 5 to 7 questions to ask. Write a brief analysis of the collected information.

Lesson 4a - Speaker Parag Khanna

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Globalization is a positive force for the world moving into the future

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Globalization is not a new idea
  • Governments may create larger problems than globalization
  • There are some negative impacts from globalization
  • Inequality is a political issue and choice more so than a problem of globalization
  • Globalization has the ability to actually help reduce poverty not increase it

 

Essential questions

  • How old is globalization?
  • Does globalization help reduce poverty?
  • Which is worse, too little trade or unfair trade?
  • Why is infrastructure investment important for globalization?
  • What role does government play in globalization?
  • Is inequality a product of globalization or of politics? How might globalization help with education?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key issues surrounding how globalization is often misunderstood
  • Differing ways globalization is used to accomplish larger goals

 

Students will be able to…

  • Explain how globalization is a positive force for growth
  • Recognize that governments may be the cause of inequality not globalization

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Learn about how globalization is not negative in and of itself

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on globalization based on the videos and develop possible solutions to issues the students may have with the speaker
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

15-20 minutes

Watch Parag Khanna’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 Minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 Minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 Minutes

Groups will pick three essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

The best way to understand the impact of globalization is to simply look at items in your home. Find as many items in your home as possible that tell where the item was made. Create a list of the items and locations of production.

Take it one step further! Print out a map and color in all the countries you found in your search and put the total number of items per country in the border. Compare what you have found with other students. This activity is also fun to do with a relative or friend. When you have completed the map post it on social media and tag: @dohadebates

 

1 – 2 days+

Students will form small groups. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

Background info: Parag Khanna

About Parag Khanna

Parag Khanna is a leading global strategy advisor, world traveler, and best-selling author. He is Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario based strategic advisory firm. Parag’s newest book is The Future is Asian: Commerce, Conflict & Culture in the 21st Century (2019). He is author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info- State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012).

In 2008, Parag was named one of Esquire’s “75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century,” and featured in WIRED magazine’s “Smart List.” He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics, and Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has traveled to nearly 150 countries and is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum.

 

Parag’s key points from Doha Debates

  • Globalization has the ability to reduce poverty Unfair trade is worse than too little trade
  • Unequal access to the internet hurts globalization Better global infrastructure development will provide greater opportunities for people
  • It is necessary to create better global redistribution networks
  • Infective governments create bigger problems
    than globalization
  • There are some negative impacts from globalization including the environment and human exploitation
  • Capitalism should be better regulated
  • There is no bad globalization just badly managed globalization
  • Globalization will help to equalize education Globalization does not fail, we do

 

Podcasts

The Future Is Asian listen

if we must… listen

Trends in Global Trade listen

On Global Connectivity listen

What Won’t Change About Globalization After Coronavirus listen

 

Videos

Rappler Talk: Parag Khanna on the pandemic’s impact on globalization watch on Youtube

How will COVID-19 shift world order? watch on YouTube

Three Reasons World War III Is Not Going to Happen Anytime Soon watch on Big Think

Immigration Resistance Masks the Global Trend of Fluid State Borders watch on Big Think

How megacities are changing the map of the world watch on YouTube

 

Other

Personal Website

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

LinkedIn

Lesson 4b - Speaker Medea Benjamin

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Demonstrate an understanding of the cost and benefits of globalization

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Global collaboration is beneficial for areas such as science and the arts
  • There are a variety of negative impacts on individuals, the environment, and overconsumption
  • Globalization may help spread junk food culture
  • Globalization may drown out local voices

 

Essential questions

  • Is it possible to live in a borderless world?
  • How has globalization wreaked havoc as an economic system?
  • What are the costs of cheap products?
  • What are the environmental impacts of globalization?
  • How might globalization be undemocratic and unfair?
  • How does globalization play out at the local level
  • What might be a simple way to for an individual to have a global impact?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key ways globalization has a negative impact on people and the planet
  • Differing ways individuals are able to make a positive change

 

Students will be able to…

  • Explain possible benefits that can be created to the planet because of globalization
  • Recognize the role globalization plays at the local level

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Learn where people stand on the issue of globalization

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on globalization based on the video and background content and develop possible solutions to issue the students may have with the speaker
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

15-20 minutes

Watch Medea Bejamin’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 minutes

Groups will pick three essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

 

Activities (Choose one or more)

One day

Students will form groups of three to four people. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson plan. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

 

1 – 2 days+

What ways might you be able to make a global impact at the local or even personal level? First, talk with your family or friends on what items might have a global impact. Second, develop a plan on how to cut back on at least one item, such as not using straws. Finally, create a list of items other people are trying not to use on a day to day basis.

Background info: Medea Benjamin

About Medea Benjamin

Medea Benjamin is the co-founder of the women-led peace group CODEPINK and the co-founder of the human rights group Global Exchange. She has been an advocate for social justice for more than 40 years. Described as “one of America’s most committed — and most effective — fighters for human rights” by New York Newsday, and “one of the high profile leaders of the peace movement” by the Los Angeles Times, she was one of 1,000 exemplary women from 140 countries nominated to receive the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the millions of women who do the essential work of peace worldwide.

She is the author of ten books, including Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control and Kingdom of the Unjust: Behind the U.S.-Saudi Connection. Her most recent book, Inside Iran: The Real History and Politics of the Islamic Republic of Iran, is part of a campaign to prevent a war with Iran and instead promote normal trade and diplomatic relations.

Her articles appear regularly in outlets such as The Guardian, The Huffington Post, CommonDreams, Alternet and The Hill.

 

Medea’s key points from Doha Debates

  • Borders are artificial constructs
  • We may live in a borderless work someday Globalization brings about important things like scientific collaboration, the United Nations, and even artistic collaboration
  • Globalization as an economic system has wreaked havoc
  • Globalization is undemocratic and unfair Globalization leads to mass migration when people look for employment
  • Globalization creates an environment where news drowns out local voices
  • Keeping economics local is more democratic
  • Start by doing something simple such as stopping using plastic straws
  • Think global but act local

 

Podcasts

Crisis in Bolivia: World BEYOND War listen

What Did Medea Benjamin Do? listen

 

Videos

The bitter reality and failure of drone warfare: Medea Bemjamin at TEDxBaltimore watch on Youtube

Medea Benjamin “Kingdom of the Unjust” watch on YouTube

Medea Benjamin v. President Obama watch on YouTube

Medea Benjamin on Hybrid Wars watch on Youtube

Bring the Troops Home & Stop the Bombing: Medea Benjamin on U.S. Withdrawal from Syria & Afghanistan watch on YouTube

Danny Glover and Medea Benjamin on Assata, Guantanamo and Trade as Cuban Flag Rises in Washington watch on YouTube

 

Articles

CodePink Founder Medea Benjamin Threatened with Arrest After Protesting U.S. Foreign Interventions read

Saudi Women’s Rights Activists Pull Back Curtain on Crown Prince read

Could COVID-19 Reshape Global Leadership? read

The Grayzone and CODEPINK demand emergency OAS election observers in 2020 Democratic presidential primarys read

‘Literally Weaponizing Coronavirus’: Despite One of World’s Worst Outbreaks of Deadly Virus, US Hits Iran With ‘Brutal’ New Sanctions read

Lesson 4c - Speaker Sisonke Msimang

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Articulate the different ways people view globalization

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Globalization is often an idea people hide behind
  • People from both rich and poor countries have reasons to like and dislike globalization
  • It is necessary to have honest conversations about globalization
  • People should attempt to change the things they do not like about globalization
  • Politics is local but may have a global impact

 

Essential questions

  • Does it matter where you live?
  • Is globalization used to stir up hatred and to blame others such as foreigners?
  • Are conversations about globalization in wealthy countries really about race and multiculturalism?
  • Why do some poor countries reject globalization?
  • What are reasons people are anti-globalization?
  • What are reasons people are pro-globalization?
  • How might local politics have a global impact?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key reasons for and against the influence of globalization
  • Differing ways globalization is used in positive and negative ways

 

Students will be able to…

  • Express the concerns of both wealthy and poor countries have regarding globalization
  • Recognize ways globalization should be seen locally and politically

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Develop a deeper understanding of globalization through personal interaction

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on globalization based on the video and background content, and develop possible solutions to issues the student may have with the speaker
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

15-20 minutes

Watch Sisonke Msimang’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 Minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 Minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 Minutes

Groups will pick three essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

 

Activities (choose one or more)

Time varies by idea

What are the economic benefits and drawbacks of global trade? Who are the winners and losers in this story of economic change? The answers to these questions are at the heart of what Sisonke speaks about in her presentation. Visit the New York Times and pick one or more of the exercises presented. These may be done on your own or with others either in a classroom setting or by video chat. Keep in mind Sisonke’s final point about the need to, “Do battle where you stand.” How might you personally do this?

 

1 – 2 days+

Students will form groups of three to four people. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson plan. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with people outside of your own town, state, or country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary. The results will be presented to the class/learning group.

Background info: Sisonke Msimang

About Sisonke Msimang

Sisonke Msimang is a writer and columnist with the Daily Maverick in South Africa. She has held fellowships at Yale University, the Aspen Institute and the University of Witswatersrand in Johannesburg.

She was born in Swaziland to parents who were political exiles, and raised in Zambia, Kenya, and Canada, before going to the US as an undergraduate. Her family returned to South Africa after the release of Nelson Mandela and the unbanning of liberation movements in the early 1990s. She currently lives on planes, navigating the distance between South Africa and Australia.

 

Sisonke’s key points from Doha Debates

  • “Globalese” is the jargon to hide behind globalization and a way to say uncomfortable things in a polite way
  • In rich countries globalization is used to stir up hatred and blame foreigners for social decline
  • Conversations about globalization in rich countries are really about race and multiculturalism
  • Poor countries oppose globalization because of companies that pollute, exploit workers, or dodge taxes
  • Conversations about globalizatioin in poor countries are about hunger, inequality, and economic justice
  • Politics is local but may have a global impact Global agreements are only as good as their weakest member
  • Ditch the term globalization and act locally and politically
  • Do battle where you stand

 

Podcasts

Live! With Sisonke Msimang, author of Always Another listen

A Pragmatic Idealist listen

Of Exile and Home: Sisonke Msimang listen

 

Videos

One Plus One: Sisonke Msimange watch

Eyes on the back of our heads: Recovering a multicultural South Africa watch

If a story moves you, act on it watch on YouTube

Mad at Mandela watch on Youtube

The impact of reconciliation watch on YouTube

Inspirational narrative – Bond Conference 2019 watch on YouTube

 

Articles

Sisonke Msimang’s 2020s vision: for social justice to prevail, we need anger fuelled by love read

I lived through Aids denialism in South Africa read

Homesick: Notes on lockdown read

When Achieng met Ellen read

What intellectuals look and sound like read

The Uber driver and Muhammad Ali read

Sisonke Msimang on how to ‘shake things up’ in your communications read

 

Other

Twitter

Instagram

Lesson 5: Connector

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

  • Explain the meaning and role of the Majlis.
  • Describe and articulate the connections between differing views on globalization.
  • Express the themes discussed by the Connector.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Globalization will not disappear in the coming decades.
  • Individual choices make a significant impact on what direction globalization will take in the future.
  • Globalization may be used to create barriers between people and countries
  • All countries play a role in globalization regardless of political leanings.

 

Essential questions

  • What is a Majlis?
  • Is inequality a political choice?
  • Is there too much “globalese” being thrown around?
  • How does Us vs. Them play into how globalization is viewed?
  • Are citizens directing their anger about globalization in the right direction?
  • Does activism still make a difference in the direction globalization is going?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key facts about how globalization is viewed within different contexts and settings.
  • The importance of resolving conflict between differing ideas and beliefs on globalization.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize differing views about globalization.
  • Express personal stance regarding globalization.
  • Use research skills to find information to support the student’s view about globalization.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Find ways to engage with and influence leaders on global issues.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Find data to support three of the essential questions discussed in the Majlis.
  • Write a final paper on where the student stands with regard to globalization with supporting resources and evidence.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In Classroom learning

5 minutes

Read about the Majlis being part of UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage.

 

5-10 minutes

Read “How a Majlis can open minds and shape our perspectives.”

 

5-10 minutes

Watch An Expert’s Guide to Getting Along to better understand the method the Connector uses to help people work together.

 

5-10 minutes

Watch the Connector video.
The second half of the full debate may be used to hear additional comments from each presenter.

 

One day+

The class/group is split into three groups. Each group is given two of the essential questions. The group will find information that supports and refutes the specific question. The class will come together to discuss what was learned based on the information that each group has found. This discussion will follow the Majlis format.

 

15-20 minutes

The class/learning group may watch additional sections of the full debate to listen to what each speaker talks about during the Majlis.

 

One day+

Each student will write a final paper on where they now stand on the issue of globalization

 

 

Outside of classroom learning

Variable time

One way to be heard about a global issue is to write people in positions of power. This may be at the local, regional, or national level. It may also be leaders of organizations or companies. Have students select an issue they see as important to them, their family, their friends, or even the planet!

Chris Thomas lays out a plan on how to best write your letter or email. Remind students, no matter where you live in the world, it is important to have your voice heard by those in power.

Relative participants:

Parag Khanna
Indian American author and journalist
Medea Benjamin
American co-founder of human rights groups
Sisonke Msimang
South African author and journalist