Doha Debates– Don't settle for a Divided World
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Water Scarcity

No one can survive more than three days without water, but a quarter of the world is running out of it. It’s a scarcity crisis on the rise, compounded by climate change. How do we get water into everyone’s hands? Who is best equipped to solve the challenge?

7 lessons

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

Know where people stand on a variety of questions regarding the issue of water scarcity.

Essential questions

  1. What is more valuable than water?

  2. What are you doing to fight climate change?

  3. What are you personally doing to conserve water every day?

  4. What do you think Earth’s environment will look like in 50 years?

  5. What’s your message to politicians unwilling to tackle climate change?

  6. In one word, what is the key to fighting climate change?

  7. Who should pay for the cost of climate change?

  8. Do you think there is still time to save the environment?

Lesson 2: Water scarcity

play
08:22
video

Are Future Water Wars Inevitable?

By 2025, two-thirds of the global population will live in a water-scarce region. Over the next century, the chance of cross-border conflicts over water could rise by 95%.

Essential questions

  1. Where are countries located with water shortages?

  2. Which activities use the greatest amount of fresh water on a daily basis?

  3. What are main reasons water scarcity might lead to conflict?

  4. Where are areas of the world where conflict might occur over water?

  5. What impact has drought had in countries like Syria?

  6. What are ways to mitigate the potential for water scarcity?

  7. What effect does climate change have on water scarcity?

Lesson 3: Short videos about the water crisis

Establish a foundation of the primary reasons water scarcity is a growing concern in different ways and in different locations.

Essential questions

  • What are the main reasons people do not have access to reliable water?

  • What are the biggest infrastructure issues facing water access?

  • What are ways to improve access to water?

  • What role do dams play in water scarcity?

  • What are different ways people have access to water?

  • What happens when people do not have clean drinking water?

  • What are methods for producing clean water?

Lesson 4a: Speaker Yana Abu Taleb

Spotlight-YanaAbuTaleb
play
10:50
video

Speaker Spotlight: Yana Abu Taleb

Yana Abu Taleb sat down to talk to us about the importance of cross-border cooperation, using water for peacemaking, and how she is personally impacted by water scarcity.

Essential questions

  1. Is water scarcity real?

  2. What are practical solutions to water scarcity?

  3. How might people be able to put aside their differences and biases to work together to address water scarcity?

  4. In what ways could people cooperate in conflict zones?

  5. Are solutions to water scarcity issues better solved at the national or local level?

  6. How is water scarcity affecting the Middle East?

  7. How might ecological peace bring about political peace?

Lesson 4b: Speaker Obakeng Leseyane

Spotlight-obakengLeseyane
play
09:37
video

Speaker Spotlight: Obakeng Leseyane

Opening remarks at Doha Debates' Water Scarcity debate by Obakeng Leseyane.

Obakeng Leseyane argues water scarcity can only be addressed through the fight for social justice and equality. Obakeng is a South African education advocate, politics fellow and youth activist.

Essential questions

  1. How might water scarcity not be a true problem?

  2. In what ways might NGOs and aid be hurting countries in Africa?

  3. What injustices impact access to and distribution of water in parts of the world?

  4. What role did Apartheid play in water inequities in South Africa?

  5. If water becomes scarce, whose lives will be valued most?

  6. What causes the problems that create unequal water access?

  7. What ways might leaders bridge the gaps in unequal access to water?

Lesson 4c: Speaker Georgie Badiel

Spotlight-GeorgieBardiel
play
09:36
video

Speaker Spotlight: Georgie Badiel

Georgie Badiel sat down to talk to us about how her experience helped her launched a foundation to build and restore wells in West Africa, and how water scarcity disproportionately affects women and girls who are required to fetch water.

Essential questions

  1. How might financial resources be a larger issue than water scarcity?

  2. What are ways people might have better access to water besides carrying it over long distances?

  3. What role does education play with regards to water scarcity?

  4. How do wealthy nations deal with water issues?

  5. In what ways could young people bring about change around water scarcity?

  6. Who should handle money being used to provide water to people in need?

  7. How can grassroots efforts provide the greatest change in who has access to water?

Lesson 5: Connector

Essential questions

  1. What is a Majlis?

  2. Which is a bigger problem, water scarcity or the structural injustice to water access?

  3. What role would more money play in helping address water scarcity?

  4. How could grassroots organizations play a larger role in dealing with water scarcity?

  5. How might governments find ways to cooperate to create more equal access to water?

  6. What role does government mismanagement play in regards to water access?

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

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Water Scarcity

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Guide to using Doha Debates curriculum

Doha Debates curriculum may be used in a variety of ways. Each section will have an associated individual lesson plan.

It is possible to use one lesson plan of your choice, the lesson plan(s) that best fit your timeframe. However, this complete and comprehensive curriculum packet is designed to build on the previous sections and lessons.
The curriculum will focus around engaging students through the following techniques:

  1. Active learning
  2. Collaborative learning
  3. Discussions
  4. Increasing student motivation and participation
  5. Problem-based learning
  6. Use of effective questions
  7. Writing assignments

 

All of the lesson plans have at least one form of student engagement related to the lesson. Content can be tailored to most subjects or any educational setting either in-class or virtually.

Specific time allotments are outlined on the next page and will be found in each lesson plan within the Learning Plan section. You may use any part of the Learning Plan components.

 

FOR EDUCATORS
Water Scarcity

Complete Curriculum for Water Scarcity

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

Flexible instruction

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Know where people stand on a variety of questions regarding the issue of water scarcity.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • There are possible ways to deal with future water scarcity.

  • Climate change is an issue people believe is important to address.

  • There is hope that climate change is something that has the potential to get better in the future.

  • Individuals believe they have the ability to help with water scarcity and climate change.

 

Essential questions

  • What is more valuable than water?

  • What are you doing to fight climate change?

  • What are you personally doing to conserve water every day?

  • What do you think Earth’s environment will look like in 50 years?

  • What’s your message to politicians unwilling to tackle climate change?

  • In one word, what is the key to fighting climate change?

  • Who should pay for the cost of climate change?

  • Do you think there is still time to save the environment?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Different issues associated with water scarcity and climate change.

  • Opinions their peers have about water scarcity and climate change.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize the personal views of how people view water scarcity.

  • Express how other people see the issues associated with water scarcity and climate change.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Understand what other people think about water scarcity and climate change through direct discussion

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Oral or written response to the essential questions

  • Explanation of how each student arrives at their view

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

5-10 minutes

Discuss what comes to mind when you hear the question, “Is water a truly scarce resource?”

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions in small groups.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions as a class/virtual learning group.

 

5 minutes

Watch the video Water Scarcity: Doha Debates Asks.

 

10-15 minutes

Focus on the question, “What are you doing to fight climate change?” Discuss what each student is doing regarding this issue. Talk about how real the issue is and why others may not believe it is real.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

Ask three to five people outside of your class/learning group four of the essential questions. The data may be collected in person or virtually. Write each person’s responses to share as a class/group.

 

One day+

There are numerous people in the world that have to collect water on a regular basis for daily use. Try to find out how much water you use daily, weekly, or even monthly. It may be challenging to know how much water you use daily, depending on your living situation. Keep track of approximately how much water you use in a week. Make note of how, how often, and how much water you use each time. Challenge other friends or family to do the same thing. Make sure to share the results with everyone either in person or virtually.

 

15-20 minutes

Share the responses from the first outside classroom activity once the information has been collected.

 

15-20 minutes

Discuss the water use findings.

Lesson 2

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Students will have a basic understanding of water scarcity and key issues based on the Doha Debates video: Are Future Water Wars Inevitable?

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Water insecurity is only getting worse over time.

  • There are a growing number of countries that have acute or extreme water shortages.

  • Cross border conflicts over water will continue to increase during this century.

  • Pollution or dams may lead to conflict more so than water scarcity.

 

Essential questions

  • Where are countries located with water shortages?

  • Which activities use the greatest amount of fresh water on a daily basis?

  • What are main reasons water scarcity might lead to conflict?

  • Where are areas of the world where conflict might occur over water?

  • What impact has drought had in countries like Syria?

  • What are ways to mitigate the potential for water scarcity?

  • What effect does climate change have on water scarcity?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key connections between water and conflict.

  • Methods by which water scarcity may be dealt with in the future.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize the growing number people who will live in water scarce regions.

  • Express problems related to control of water between countries.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Understand other people’s general views about water scarcity and conflict.

  • View water data to understand why conflict arises over water.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Oral or written response to the essential questions.

  • Explanation of how each students arrives at their view.

  • Data collection from other people outside of the classroom regarding water scarcity

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

10 minutes

Watch the Doha Debates video: Are Future Water Wars Inevitable?

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions in small groups/virtual learning groups and then as a class or discuss the questions as a class only.

 

15-20 minutes

Visit Water from Clouds. This link comes from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. Look through the facts provided and think about how it affects people around the world on a daily basis.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

How much water do you use each day? In 2018, Cape Town, South Africa implanted a directive that allowed a person to only use 50 liters (13 gallons) per day. Challenge yourself to try this for even one day. After you understand how little water this is, what changes might you make to your daily habits? Try going a week on just 50 liters per day. Challenge your family and friends to only use 50 liters of water a day!

Ask 3-5 people outside of the classroom the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

 

The next two activities may be completed during the next class meeting

10-15 minutes

Discuss the results collected from asking the essential questions.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss what each person thought about the data viewed on the United Nations website.

Lesson 3 - Short videos about the water crisis

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Establish a foundation of the primary reasons water scarcity is a growing concern in different ways and in different locations.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • A growing number of places don’t have access to reliable or clean drinking water.

  • Infrastructure is one of the primary reasons water scarcity is an issue.

  • It’s becoming increasingly difficult to balance the needs of water use across borders.

  • Technology brings new opportunities to develop ways for people to access water.

 

Essential questions

  • What are the main reasons people do not have access to reliable water?

  • What are the biggest infrastructure issues facing water access?

  • What are ways to improve access to water?

  • What role do dams play in water scarcity?

  • What are different ways people have access to water?

  • What happens when people do not have clean drinking water?

  • What are methods for producing clean water?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key facts about how water scarcity is affecting different parts of the world.

  • Different ways people are dealing with water scarcity.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize the various methods being used to deal with water access.

  • Express ways to help deal with water scarcity.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Describe the challenges in managing water resources

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Students will watch short videos and discuss additional problems presented in each

  • Students will form groups to find additional evidence for each of videos shown

  • The additional evidence found will be presented to the class/learning group either in oral form or through a brief visual presentation

  • Completion of associated tasks with each video

  • Oral or written response to the essential questions

  • Explanation of how each students arrives their view

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

15-30 minutes

Start with essential questions. The questions may be discussed in a small group first and then as a whole class/learning group.

 

10 minutes

Watch Running Dry: Karachi’s Water Crisis and discuss. Essential Question: What role does fixing infrastructure and corruption play in getting people the water they need?

 

10-15 minutes

Watch What’s behind the Egypt-Ethiopia Nile dispute? and discuss. Essential Question: What impact will the Ethiopian dam have on Egypt?

 

Activitiy

One day

How easy is it to control water resources? Find out by playing the online game Catchment Detox to see if you can successfully manage a river catchment and create a sustainable and thriving economy.

Ask your family or friends to play it as well and then talk about the challenges faced in the game. After you have played the game post your results on social media and tag @dohadebates and @projectexplorer.

Lesson 4a - Speaker Yana Abu Taleb

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Demonstrate an understanding of how water scarcity is real and a pragmatic approach is the best option looking towards the future

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Water scarcity may bring about conflict.

  • Local solutions to water scarcity may be more effective.

  • The problem of water scarcity does not belong to one nation.

  • The only way to solve the problems of water scarcity is through cooperation.

  • The amount of water people use daily varies greatly around the world.

 

Essential questions

  • Is water scarcity real?

  • What are practical solutions to water scarcity?

  • How might people be able to put aside their differences and biases to work together to address water scarcity?

  • In what ways could people cooperate in conflict zones?

  • Are solutions to water scarcity issues better solved at the national or local level?

  • How is water scarcity affecting the Middle East?

  • How might ecological peace bring about political peace?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key issues surrounding a pragmatic approach to water scarcity.

  • Differing ways water scarcity is a local issue not just a national issue.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Explain how water scarcity may be tied directly to conflict within and between countries.

  • Recognize that water scarcity has the possibility of bringing people together.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Learn about how people in the developing world deal with the lack of access to water for daily use.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on water scarcity based on the video and background content and develop possible solutions to issues the students may have with the speaker.

  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

10-15 minutes

Watch Yana Abu Taleb’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 Minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 Minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 Minutes

Groups will pick three essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

Activities (Choose one or more)

One day

What challenges do people living in the developing world face with regards to water scarcity? Not having direct access to water makes each day a far greater challenge. Play the game Water Quest to see the difficulties people face.

Encourage your family and friends to try the game as well. Post your results on social media and tag: @dohadebates and @projectexplorer

 

1 – 2 days+

Students will form small groups. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

Background info: Yana Abu Taleb

About Yana Abu Taleb

Yana Abu Taleb is the Jordanian Director of EcoPeace Middle East which is a unique regional organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian and Israeli environmentalists to promote sustainable development and advance peace efforts in the Middle East. The organization has offices in Amman, Ramallah and Tel-Aviv. As Jordanian Director, Ms. Abu Taleb leads EcoPeace activities concerning the Jordan River, the Dead Sea, the Good Water Neighbors and the Water Energy Nexus Projects. Her responsibilities include supervising international project development and management, serving as a liaison to and lobbying of governmental and private sector figures and organizations on major regional policy issues relevant to environmental protection and transboundary water. She is heavily involved in solar energy projects in the region and promotes renewable energy initiatives in Jordan. She co-authored many reports and policy papers and speaks regularly at local and international conferences. Before becoming the Jordanian director of EcoPeace Middle East, Ms. Abu Taleb was the Deputy Director and Regional Projects Manager of the organization. She also managed a program aiming at modernizing the educational system in Saudi Arabia implemented by the British Council. She received a degree from the University of Jordan in 1996.

 

Yana’s key points from Doha Debates Presentation

  • Water scarcity is real and the solution is pragmatism It is about practical solutions

  • We need to get people to put aside differences and biases to be able to work together to make water available

  • Lack of sanitation helps spread disease

  • Can anyone really be focusing on national solutions to water?

  • The problem does not belong to one nation

  • The importance of ecological peace not just political peace

 

Podcasts

Middle East water issues in the Jordan River Valley listen

Videos

Yana Abu Taleb’s Message for Earth Day 2020 watch on Youtube

EcoPeace’s Directors Present on Water Scarcity and Regional Cooperation at the UN Security Council watch on YouTube

Raising Awareness About the Disposal of Industrial Waste in Hebron watch on YouTube

Water Shortage in Palestine from Gender Perspective watch on YouTube

World Water Day 2017 watch on YouTube

 

Articles

To Prevent Water Shortages, Jordan must Act without Delay read

‘Peace With Not Just People, But Also Nature’ read

Remove water from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, urges EcoPeace read

Ripple Effects: Sharing Water and Building Peace in the Jordan River Valley read

‘South Africa: Where the Impossible Happens’ read

Israel, Palestine and Jordan team up to save river read

 

Other

Twitter

Facebook

Lesson 4b - Speaker Obakeng Leseyane

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Demonstrate an understanding of how structural injustice of access to water is a larger issue than water scarcity.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • The injustice around access to water is a larger issue than water scarcity in many places in the world.

  • There is enough water in most countries to meet basic needs.

  • Leaders should be elected to bridge gaps where there is injustice not reinforce them.

  • People cannot sit back when government fails.

 

Essential questions

  • How might water scarcity not be a true problem?

  • In what ways might NGOs and aid be hurting countries in Africa?

  • What injustices impact access to and distribution of water in parts of the world?

  • What role did Apartheid play in water inequities in South Africa?

  • If water becomes scarce, whose lives will be valued most?

  • What causes the problems that create unequal water access?

  • What ways might leaders bridge the gaps in unequal access to water?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key ways water scarcity is connected to injustice.

  • Differing ways people deal with water scarcity.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Explain possible ways the rich are protected by their privilege.

  • Recognize the importance of water equity throughout the world.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Learn about how water is used on a daily basis in the home.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on water scarcity based on the video and background content and develop possible solutions to issues the students may have with the speaker.

  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

15-20 minutes

Watch Obakeng Leseyane’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 minutes

Data helps students understand the larger context of an issue like water scarcity. Obakeng’s focus is on the often unjust and unequal access to water. Our World In Data will allow students to see how unsafe water impacts people around the world. Students will examine graphs presented on the website and then discuss what the data says of injustice and water access.

 

Activities (Choose one or more)

1 day

How much water is wasted with even just the drip of a faucet? The best way to find out is through simple observation. Find a bucket or other large item in which to catch dripping water. Put the bucket under a water source outside and turn it on just enough so there is a very slow drip. Make sure to set a timer or some type of reminder about the experiment. Let the source drip for one hour (make sure to check on it from time to time). Figure out how much water was wasted. Have family or friends try this expermiment at home as well and share the results with each other.

 

1 – 2 days+

Students will form small groups. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

Background info: Obakeng Leseyane

About Obakeng Leseyane

Obakeng is a South African education activist, a journey inspired by his coming of age. He is the Founder of EdConnect Labs, a recent graduate of the African Leadership Academy (Class of 2018), the youngest Inaugural Public Service fellow at Apolitical Academy (2018/2019), was named Young Leader to watch by FastCompany South Africa in 2018. His work has been featured on local and international platforms such as Forbes, Huffington Post, BBC, and CNN Africa, FastCompany and many others. He regularly contributes to local and international media in sharing light on critical issues from the political landscape to the state of global education. During the course of his advocacy since 2016, he has been recognized by Forbes, Qatar Foundation, TheirWorld Organisation. NBA Africa, Apolitical Co and etc as a Thought Leader. Most notably, Obakeng delivered a TEDxTalk entitled ‘Enslaved by poverty; Education was my liberation’ in late 2018. Ultimately he believes that education is a vehicle for social justice.

 

Obakeng’s key points from Doha Debates

  • There is no water scarcity, there is a crisis of power and justice

  • Africa doesn’t need more NGOs, aid, or more schools to teacher people how to dig a well

  • NGOs fail to address the structural root of injustice impacting access to and distribution of water Justice needs to be the lens for the debate about water scarcity

  • Solutions must take into account systemic problems In South Africa, you can’t talk about water scarcity without talking about the legacy of Apartheid

  • The United Nations Development Programme says there is enough water in most countries to meet basic needs
    We must demand just and equal access for those that have been structurally excluded

 

Podcasts

The Leader’s Podcast listen

An advocate for access to quality education, founder of Ed Connect Labs listen

Thought Council: Discussing GBV, Africa’s oldest president and xenophobia listen

Though leaders, storytellers, and griots listen

 

Videos

A Divided South Africa | Bigger Than Five watch on Youtube

Enslaved By Poverty, Education Was My Liberation |Obakeng Leseyane | TEDxPretoria watch on YouTube

Make it Happen! watch on YouTube

EdConnect Initiative The Education Movement watch on YouTube

Obakeng Leseyane watch on YouTube

 

Articles

How Obakeng Leseyane went from not knowing a word of English at 10 to becoming an entrepreneur and giving Ted-X talks at 21 read

The startling costs of funding the average South African family’s education read

The Country With The World’s Worst Inequality Is… read

South Africa is the world’s most unequal country read

The Coffee Farmers Betting On Blockchain To Boost Business read

 

Other

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Lesson 4c - Speaker Georgie Badiel

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Demonstrate an understanding of how structural injustice of access to water is a larger issue than water scarcity.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • It is mostly girls and women who gather and carry water over long distances.

  • Education will bring the greatest opportunity for girls.

  • Grassroots activism has the potential to provide access to clean water.

  • It is important to create a collaborative approach with universities and the government.

  • Allowing money to get to people who need it to access clean water is vital for future development.

 

Essential questions

  • How might financial resources be a larger issue than water scarcity?

  • What are ways people might have better access to water besides carrying it over long distances?

  • What role does education play with regards to water scarcity?

  • How do wealthy nations deal with water issues?

  • In what ways could young people bring about change around water scarcity?

  • Who should handle money being used to provide water to people in need?

  • How can grassroots efforts provide the greatest change in who has access to water?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key reasons water scarcity is a matter of resources not water itself.

  • Differing ways to bring clean water to people in need.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Express the importance of young people’s involvement in water access and security.

  • Recognize the need for grassroots groups to partner with organizations including the government.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Experience what it is like to carry large amounts of water over a long distance.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on water scarcity based on the video and background content and develop possible solutions to issues the students may have with the speaker.

  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

15-20 minutes

Watch Georgie Badiel’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 Minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 Minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 Minutes

What is the real impact on girls and women having to carry water? Watch Searching for Water in Ethiopia: A Day in the Life, to hear the story first hand. Students will discuss what was learned from watching the video and possible solutions.

 

Outside learnings

1 day

Women and girls (sometimes boys) must carry water long distances in certain parts of the world. The average distance is 6 kilometers (3.7 miles). The average amount of water carried is between 20 to 50 liters (5 to 13 gallons). Keep in mind one gallon of water weighs about 8 pounds! What would it be like to do this almost every day? This at home activity will give students the opportunity to find out. Find closed containers such as a one gallon milk jug. Try to find enough containers to hold at least 5 gallons of water. Figure out how to carry it and then go for a walk. Don’t worry about people staring at you! See if you can walk one mile. Challenge family and friends to try this activity and talk about the experience.

 

1 – 2 days+

Students will form small groups. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

Background info: Georgie Badiel

About Georgie Badiel

Georgie Badiel is a Burkinabé model and activist living and working in New York City. Badiel was Miss Africa 2004. She is also an author and activist who has taken on the issue of the lack of potable drinking water in her West African homeland. Therein she runs the Georgie Badiel Foundation which is dedicated to raising funds to support the cause. Now together with the children’s book author, Peter H. Reynolds and Susan Verde, she has co-created the book The Water Princess, a picture book which tells the story of her West African nation’s desperate need for aquifers through her life as a young girl who dreams of bringing clean water to her people. The book was published by Penguin Random House in 2016. Her foundation partners with Ryan’s Well Foundation to provide safe drinking water to communities in Africa.

 

Christina’s key points from Doha Debates

  • There is no water crisis, there is a money crisis

  • The money (needed for water access) never goes to the people

  • Millions of hours are spent annually collecting water

  • Women are being taught to build, maintain, and repair wells

  • It is important to pass on learning to the next generation

  • Wealthiest nations have the resources to handle the water crisis

  • These are the same countries that have helped themselves to our (Africa’s) resources for centuries

  • The best method for this crisis is grassroots activists

 

Podcasts

Water Activist & Model listen

 

Videos

The Water Princess watch on Youtube

Giving Water Is Giving Life watch on YouTube

I want to bring clean drinking water to the entire Burkina Faso watch on YouTube

Bike for Africa North America Edition watch on YouTube

This Model Empowers Women Through Water watch on Bloomberg

 

Articles

Georgie Badiel is more than a supermodel, she is a superhero read

With Her Princess GieGie Children’s Book Series, Model Georgie Badiel Is Telling the Stories of African Girls read

This World Water Day, Meet A Top Model Who Has Made Water Accessible To 100K People In Africa read

How Georgie Badiel-Liberty is bringing sub-Saharan Africa’s water scarcity to the forefront read

 

Other

Facebook

Instagram

Lesson 5: Connector

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

  • Explain the meaning and role of the Majlis.

  • Describe and articulate the connections between differing views on water scarcity.

  • Express the themes discussed by the Connector.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Water scarcity is real but there are myriad other issues that affect access.

  • Structural injustice often plays a role in who has access to water.

  • Grassroots organizations have the ability to bring change.

  • Infrastructure issues and mismanagement can create water scarcity.

  • Money needs to be allocated in ways that allow for better access to water.

 

Essential questions

  • What is a Majlis?

  • Which is a bigger problem, water scarcity or the structural injustice to water access?

  • What role would more money play in helping address water scarcity?

  • How could grassroots organizations play a larger role in dealing with water scarcity?

  • How might governments find ways to cooperate to create more equal access to water?

  • What role does government mismanagement play in regards to water access?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key facts about how our understanding of water scarcity is evolving.

  • The importance of dealing with water scarcity and resources.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize differing views about water scarcity.

  • Express personal stance regarding water scarcity.

  • Use research skills to find information to support the student’s view about water scarcity.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Find ways to help those dealing with water scarcity.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Find data to support three of the essential questions discussed in the Majlis.

  • Write a final paper on where the student stands with regard to water scarcity with supporting resources and evidence.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In Classroom learning

5 minutes

Read about the Majlis being part of UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage.

 

5-10 minutes

Read “How a Majlis can open minds and shape our perspectives.”

 

5-10 minutes

Watch An Expert’s Guide to Getting Along to better understand the method the Connector uses to help people work together.

 

5-10 minutes

The second half (beginning at minute 24) of the full debate may be used to hear additional comments from each presenter.

 

One day+

The class/group is split into three groups. Each group is given two of the essential questions. The group will find information that supports and refutes the specific question. The class will come together to discuss what was learned based on the information that each group has found. This discussion will follow the Majlis format.

 

15-20 minutes

The class/learning group may watch additional sections of the full debate to listen to what each speaker talks about during the Majlis.

 

One day+

Each student will write a final paper on where they now stand on the issue of water scarcity.

 

 

Outside of classroom learning

Variable time

Water scarcity is an issue facing millions of people around the world. What can students do to help others living in these conditions? There are a variety of resources and organizations that provide opportunities to get involved – 10 nonprofits fighting the global water crisis.

One such organization is Charity Water. See how you might be able to support or get involved with Charity Water or any of many other groups making a difference.

Relative participants:

Yana Abu Taleb
Jordanian director of EcoPeace Middle East
Obakeng Leseyane
South African education advocate and youth activist
Georgie Badiel
Burkinabé model, author and activist