Doha Debates– Don't settle for a Divided World
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Loss of Trust

Public trust in governments is near historic lows, as confidence plummets and belief in institutions’ basic fairness and functions erodes each day. How can we restore trust? Or should we not? Should we move trust to new social initiatives and technologies instead of the old formal bodies of government?

7 lessons

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

government trust_dd asks
play
4:33
video

Doha Debates Asks: Can Governments Be Trusted?

Do you think governments can be trusted?

We hit the streets of Rio, Paris, and Tunis and asked people their thoughts about their trust in government. Here’s what they said:

Essential questions

1. Can the government be trusted?

2. What is the role of the government?

3. Do you think voting matters?

4. What is the first word that comes to mind when you hear “politician”?

5. Would you ever run for office?

6. What is the best way to get your voice heard?

7. Do you think you have the power to change the system?

8. What is your message to world leaders?

Lesson 2: Do You Trust the Government

TRUSTING THE GOVERNMENT EXPLAINER
play
6:53
video

Do You Trust The Government?

Difficult times mean difficult decisions, but is the government always doing what's right? Global trust in government is collapsing - can we restore it? (video originally produced in 2019)

Essential questions

  1. Why do people appear to be fed up with government?
  2. What role does trust play in society?
  3. Why do people trust money as a method of exchange?
  4. Is crypto-currency a safer method of money?
  5. Should people trust Artificial Intelligence to make decisions?
  6. It is possible to rebuild trust in government?
  7. Could technology allow people to have a greater and more direct voice in government?

Lesson 3: Blockchain: Massively Simplified and Other Short Videos

Richie Etwaru, discusses the opportunity and implications of blockchain as a paradigm to slow/chose the expanding trust gap in commerce. He unpacks blockchain to a level of simplicity to be consumed by those that are just starting to understand and explore the paradigm. He lays out a current state of commerce, suggesting that every company is currently at risk of being disrupted or incurring severe strain from a blockchain version of itself.

Professionally, Richie Etwaru is a c-level at a Fortune 500 Company, an author, the owner of international patents, the founder of multiple ventures, an experienced keynote speaker, an angel investor, a member of advisory boards, and a recognized thought leader in the area of digital, technology, and design.

Specific to this TEDx talk, Richie is an adjunct professor of blockchain management at Syracuse University in New York, he has delivered over 100 blockchain keynotes across the world, he has written well read blockchain blogs, he has been interviewed on blockchain in online TV shows, and has advised governments and venture funds on blockchain opportunities.

Essential questions

  1. Why does the trust gap in society continue to expand?
  2. In what ways are trust and reputation related to each other?
  3. How might blockchain create trust in companies?
  4. What are ways blockchain will allow for greater trust?
  5. How should people throughout the world share common resources?
  6. What if people were randomly selected to be in government?
  7. In what ways might diversity trump ability?

Lesson 4a: Speaker Toni Lane Casserly

Toni Lane Opening Remarks
play
2:53
video

Toni Lane Casserly: The Argument for Blockchain Technology

Watch the full opening remarks by Toni Lane Casserly at our loss of trust debate. Lane Casserly, argued for blockchain technologies and rallied for a movement that transforms governments into networks of communities beyond borders, arguing that we should give up on conventional governments and create transnational, decentralized systems.

Essential questions

  1. Why is trust in government at an all time low?
  2. How does the government fail to serve the people?
  3. Do people have more power voting with a credit card or through an election?
  4. In what ways might people have a greater ownership of their rights?
  5. How might blockchain give individuals great social and political power?
  6. Why do people think the government does not have the humanity to move society forward?

Lesson 4b: Speaker Brett Henning

LOSS OF TRUST_BRETT HENNIG OPENING REMARKS
play
03:27
video

Brett Hennig: Replace Politicians With Randomly Selected People

Watch the full opening remarks by Brett Hennig at our loss of trust debate. Hennig argued for “citizens’ assemblies,” groups of randomly selected citizens who reflect their communities’ diversity and make decisions in place of elected politicians.

Essential questions

  1. Why is trust in government at historic lows?
  2. How might societies thrive even with low trust in government?
  3. Why do people often not actually know what or who they are voting for?
  4. In what ways do even the worst governments still help their people?
  5. What are ways government can engage with people?
  6. What basic services should all governments provide?
  7. What issues are there to random citizens’ assemblies being part of government?

Lesson 4c: Speaker Prince Zeid Ra'ad Zeid al-Hussein

Zeid Opening Remarks
play
2:53
video

Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein: Rebuild Trust In Government

Watch the full opening remarks by Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein at our loss of trust debate. Al-Hussein argued that we must repair trust in government by improving the quality of leadership, especially among young people.

Essential questions

  1. Why is it possible to make small adjustments between individuals?
  2. Why are people seduced by revolutionary thinking?
  3. How might harmony be achieved between groups with different ideas?
  4. What might happen if all people were required to vote?
  5. How might things change if people over 65 could no longer vote?
  6. What would make young people better leaders? What qualities make for the best political leaders?

Lesson 5: Connector

how to get along
play
03:55
video

How to Get Along With Other People

Dr. Govinda Clayton sat down with Doha Debates to explain how to make the most out of tough conversations and the secret to getting along with others.

Essential questions

  1. What is a majlis?
  2. What are drawbacks to randomly selected people working with people in positions of power?
  3. How might change disempower people?
  4. Why do you trust the people you do?
  5. Where does change come from in society?
  6. Is there a need for a intermediary position like that of the government?
  7. What other forms of government could develop to create greater trust?
  8. In what ways might technology lessen trust?

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

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Loss of Trust

About Deep Dive

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Guide to using Doha Debats curriculum

Doha Debates curriculum may be used in a variety of ways. Each section will have an associated individual lesson plan.

It is possible to use one lesson plan of your choice, the lesson plan(s) that best fit your timeframe. However, this complete and comprehensive curriculum packet is designed to build on the previous sections and lessons.
The curriculum will focus around engaging students through the following techniques:

  1. Active learning
  2. Collaborative learning
  3. Discussions
  4. Increasing student motivation and participation 5. Problem-based learning
  5. Use of effective questions
  6. Writing assignments

 

All of the lesson plans have at least one form of student engagement related to the lesson. Content can be tailored to most subjects.

Specific time allotments are outlined on the next page and will be found in each lesson plan within the Learning Plan section. You may use any part of the Learning Plan components.

 

FOR EDUCATORS
Loss of Trust

Complete Curriculum for Loss of Trust

Doha Debates hosts discussions on the world’s most pressing challenges to bridge differences, build consensus and identify solutions. In each moderated live debate, experts share their experiences and propose concrete plans. Doha Debates also offers digital resources such as videos and articles to help students build a deep understanding of the issues and to foster ongoing conversations.

Lesson 1: Doha Debates Asks

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Know where people stand on a variety of questions regarding loss of trust in government.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • People do not always trust the government.
  • Politicians are often seen in a negative light.
  • People would like to change the system but often feel it is not within their power to do so.
  • A person’s vote may seem pointless at times if change is not seen through that vote.

 

Essential questions

  • Can the government be trusted?
  • What is the role of the government?
  • Do you think voting matters?
  • What is the first word that comes to mind when you hear “politician”?
  • Would you ever run for office?
  • What is the best way to get your voice heard?
  • Do you think you have the power to change the system?
  • What is your message to world leaders?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Different issues associated with the role of government
  • Opinions their peers have about loss of trust in government

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize the personal views of how people view the government
  • Express how other people see issues associated with loss of trust in government

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Understand what other people think about loss of trust through direct discussion.
  • Show how political advertisements are presented and interpreted by the viewer.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Oral or written response to the essential questions
  • Explanation of how each student arrives at their view

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

5-10 minutes

Discuss what comes to mind when you hear the phrase, “Do you trust the government?”

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions in small groups.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions as a class

 

5 minutes

Watch the video Loss of Trust: Doha Debates Asks.

 

10-15 minutes

Focus on the question, “Would you ever run for office?” Discuss why a person would or would not run for office. Think about the people currently in political office and how they are seen by the public.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

Ask three to five people outside of your class/learning group four of the essential questions. The data may be collected in person or virtually. Write each person’s responses to share as a class/group.

Find three to five political ads that you believe do or do not create a since of trust in the politician. The ads may be in a video or printed format. What does the ad say about the politician? Is there a difference between the surface message and a possible underlying message? How truthful do you believe the message is? Develop one or two more questions of your own to ask other students about their ads.

 

15-20 minutes

Share the responses from the first activity once the information has been collected.

 

15-20 minutes

Each student shares an example of the political ads found.

Lesson 2

Flexible instruction

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, e-learning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally).

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Students will have a basic understanding of trust in government and key issues based on the Doha Debates video: Should We Trust Our Governments?

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Trust in government has declined significantly in the past 60 years in the US and around the world.
  • Protests are one way to have the public voice heard.
  • The majority of Americas believe that democracy is still the best form of government.
  • Greater transparency might result in greater trust in government.

 

Essential questions

  • Why do people appear to be fed up with government?
  • What role does trust play in society?
  • Why do people trust money as a method of exchange?
  • Is crypto-currency a safer method of money?
  • Should people trust Artificial Intelligence to make decisions?
  • It is possible to rebuild trust in government?
  • Could technology allow people to have a greater and more direct voice in government?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key connections through the loss of trust in governments
  • Methods by which people might develop technology to create greater trust

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize ways people deal with lack of trust in government
  • Express problems related to the distrust of government

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Understand other people’s general views about trust in government
  • View data on trust in government and each other

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Oral or written response to the essential questions
  • Explanation of how each students arrives at their view
  • Data collection from other people outside of the classroom regarding views on government

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, e-learning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for e-learning or distance learning

 

10 minutes

Watch the Doha Debates video: Should We Trust Our Governments?

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the essential questions in small groups and then as a class or discuss the questions as a class only.

 

15-20 minutes

Direct students to: Democracy OS website. Discuss as a class the pros and cons of digitizing democracy.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

30 minutes +

Look at the following two pages from the Pew Research Center:

Public Trust in Government: 1958-2019

Key findings about Americans’ declining trust in government and each other

Discuss your understanding of what the data is saying about trust in government and the direction it may head in the future. How might the COVID-19 Pandemic affect trust in government?

 

One day

Ask 5 people outside of the classroom the essential questions from this lesson. Answers may be collected in-person or virtually. Information will be brought back to class or virtual learning group for evaluation and discussion.

 

10-15 minutes

Discuss the results collected from asking the essential questions.

 

15-20 minutes

Discuss what each person thought about the data viewed on the Pew Research Center Website.

Lesson 3 - Blockchain: Massively Simplified and other short videos

Flexible instruction

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Establish a foundation of primary issues that loss of trust presents in different ways and in different settings.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Many people believe living in a democracy is a good thing.
  • Most people don’t think democracy actually functions well.
  • Trust is directly connected to reputation.
  • Blockchain has the ability to create greater trust.
  • Blockchain eliminates the middleman allowing for greater transparency.

 

Essential questions

  • Why does the trust gap in society continue to expand?
  • In what ways are trust and reputation related to each other?
  • How might blockchain create trust in companies?
  • What are ways blockchain will allow for greater trust?
  • How should people throughout the world share common resources?
  • What if people were randomly selected to be in government?
  • In what ways might diversity trump ability?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key facts about how trust in many systems is declining
  • Different ways people are losing trust in many sectors of life

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize the various ways loss of trust might be able to be regained
  • Express how loss of trust is not a new problem

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Describe the role trust plays in how humans interact

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Students will go through each video and additional problems associated with each video.
  • Students will form groups to find additional evidence to each of the videos that will be shown to the whole class.
  • The additional evidence found will be presented to the class either in oral form or through a brief visual presentation.
  • Completion of associated tasks with each video. Oral or written response to the essential questions. Explanation of how each students arrives at their view.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

15-30 minutes

Start with essential questions. The questions may be discussed in a small group first and then as a whole class/learning group.

 

20-25 minutes

Watch Blockchain: Massively Simplified and discuss as a class. Essential Question: Will expanded use of blockchain create greater trust?

 

15-20 minutes

Watch Sortition – doing democracy differently and discuss as a class. Essential Question: How should we live together to create a greater sense of trust?

 

Activity

One day+

Trust is vital for people and society to move forward. The following game will give you a way understand how trust spreads. Play The Evolution of Trust and then have your family and friends play it as well. Discuss the results to better understand how others view the topic of trust.

Lesson 4a - Speaker Toni Lane Casserly

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Loss of trust in government could be changed by incorporating the use of blockchain into the governing process.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Blockchain is a possible way to place greater power in the hands of individuals.
  • Sovereign rights should be controlled by people as much as government. Blockchain has the ability to eliminate the middlemen and replace trust in the system.
  • Government does not have the humanity to move the world forward. Technology is a tool that endures based on the people who use it.

 

Essential questions

  • Why is trust in government at an all time low?
  • How does the government fail to serve the people? Do people have more power voting with a credit card or through an election?
  • In what ways might people have a greater ownership of their rights?
  • How might blockchain give individuals great social and political power?
  • Why do people think the government does not have the humanity to move society forward?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key issues surrounding ways to change the loss of trust in government.
  • Differing ways blockchain might work outside of government.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Explain how loss of trust in government might be mitigated by blockchain.
  • Recognize that governments use power in ways that push people away.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Learn about how blockchain has the ability to enhance the power people have within society.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on loss of trust based on the video and background content and develop possible solutions to issues the students may have with the speaker.
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

15-20 minutes

Watch Toni Lane Casserly’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 Minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 Minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 Minutes

Groups will pick three essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

Activities (choose one or more

One day

Blockchain is being used for a growing variety of applications. Online gaming is using blockchain to allow for the decentralization of the gaming industry. Read about and try the 10 most anticipated blockchain games for 2020. Try one of games to see how it works. When you have tired one of the blockchain games post it on social media and tag @dohadebates.

 

1 – 2 days+

Students will form small groups. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

Background info: Toni Lane Casserly

About Toni Lane Casserly

Toni Lane was an artrepreneur in the Digital Currency and Blockchain Industry. She was a core founder at several impactful ventures, including CoinTelegraph.

She is an empath, investor, artist, advisory board member, transformational evangelist and founder who has been affectionately entitled “The Joan of Arc of Blockchain” by her peers and various publications.

She was a figurehead for the use of technology to enable peaceful evolution into new forms of societal structures. Her speaking was featured by BigThink, TEDx, Katapult, Polycon, Innovate your State, DraperU, NEXUSearth, Exponential Finance, World Crypto Economic Forum, Blockchain Economic Forum and many others.

 

Toni’s key points from Doha Debates

  • Trust in government is at an all time low Governments fail to serve the people
  • We have more power voting with our credit cards then we do in a national election
  • Technology represents something that is innately human
  • Technology is a tool and endures based on the people who use the technology
  • Blockchain has promise to eliminate the middlemen that are gerrymandering trust from individuals
  • Individuals need to own their own sovereign rights
  • Blockchain would allow people to register anonymously acts perpetrated by governments or other groups
  • Government does not have the humanity to move the world forward

 

Podcasts

  • Paradigm Shifts of Culture and Consciousness listen
  • How Blockchains Could Create Community Consciousness listen
  • Free Cities Podcast listen

 

Videos

Lesson 4b - Speaker Brett Henning

Flexible instruction

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Demonstrate an understanding of how citizens’ assemblies with randomly selected people could work alongside the government.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • Citizens’ assemblies are a way for people to directly influence what happens in government.
  • Even the worst governments in the world still provide the most basic services and put food on the table.
  • Societies are able to thrive even when there is low trust in government.
  • Growing protests around the world are forcing some governments to engage with its citizens.

 

Essential questions

  • Why is trust in government at historic lows?
  • How might societies thrive even with low trust in government?
  • Why do people often not actually know what or who they are voting for?
  • In what ways do even the worst governments still help their people?
  • What are ways government can engage with people? What basic services should all governments provide?
  • What issues are there to random citizens’ assemblies being part of government?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key ways loss of trust in government has increased over time.
  • Differing ways citizens are able to work directly with governments.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Explain possible benefits of citizens’ assemblies working alongside governments.
  • Recognize the importance of direct citizen participation in government.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Learn about citizens’ assemblies and if there are any where the student lives.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on loss of trust based on the video and background content and develop possible solutions to issues the students may have with the speaker.
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In Classroom learning

15-20 minutes

Watch Brett Henning’s Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 Minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 Minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 Minutes

Groups will pick three essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

Students will form small groups. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

 

One day

A variation of the first learning task is to switch from asking the essential questions to asking what topics would be best served with a citizens’ assembly. Also ask if the person would be willing to participate and why or why not depending on the answer. One final step is to find out if there are any citizens’ assemblies near where you live.

Background info: Brett Henning

About Brett Henning

Brett Hennig co-founded and directs the Sortition Foundation, which campaigns to institute the use of stratified, random selection (also called sortition) in government.

Before co-founding the Sortition Foundation, Brett Hennig wore a variety of hats: as a taxi driver, a software engineer, a social justice activist, a mathematics tutor and the primary carer of four boys. He finished his PhD in astrophysics just before his first son arrived.

After spending several disheartening years in civil society organizations and politics, Hennig became inspired by Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s trilogy on political philosophy and began investigating and researching network forms of democracy. The resulting book, The End of Politicians: Time for a Real Democracy has been called “a book for visionaries.”

 

[Speaker lastname]’s key points from Doha Debates

  • Trust in government is at historic lows all over the world
  • Even with low trust there is still at least some trust Societies can thrive even with low trust Governments should engage in new ways of listening and then act on what the people say
  • Voting is part of democracy but do people really take time to understand what and who they are voting for?
  • Even the worst governments have to provide basic services and put food on the table of its people
  • Governments have to engage with the people France is bringing together a citizens’ assembly to deal with climate change. Scotland created a citizens’ assembly to discuss Brexit
  • Citizens’ assemblies are the way that societies can thrive with low trust
  • There are already nearly 100 citizens’ assemblies around the world

 

Podcasts

Sortition – Election of Political Officials from a Random Sample listen

What if we replaced politicians with randomly selected people? listen

Hacking the Law listen

 

Articles

Will the UK’s climate assembly actually make any difference? read on Wired

UK citizens’ assembly calls coronavirus a ‘test run’ for greener lifestyles read on Reuters

Citizens’ assembly needed for post-COVID recovery read on The Telegram

 

Videos

Let’s fix this broken democracy… let’s randomly select our politicians! watch on Youtube

Back to the Future for a Real Democracy watch on YouTube

The End of Politicians: Time for a Real Democracy watch on YouTube

A real democracy would use sortition watch on YouTube

Are we (collectively) stupid? watch on YouTube

 

Other

Website

Twitter

Facebook

Lesson 4c - Speaker Prince Zeid Ra'ad Zeid al-Hussein

Flexible instruction

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, elearning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally.)

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

Articulate the importance of rebuilding trust in government through improving the quality of leadership.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • The majority of people believe there needs to be better political leadership.
  • Harmony is difficult to achieve even within the most trusted networks.
  • Putting a cap for the age of voting would benefit everyone.
  • It is important and even necessary for young people to vote and seek leadership roles.
  • Revolutionary thinking does not always lead to positive results.

 

Essential questions

  • Why is it possible to make small adjustments between individuals?
  • Why are people seduced by revolutionary thinking? How might harmony be achieved between groups with different ideas?
  • What might happen if all people were required to vote?
  • How might things change if people over 65 could no longer vote?
  • What would make young people better leaders? What qualities make for the best political leaders?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key reasons why trust is low in government abilities.
  • Differing ways young people can make a difference in politics.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Express how politics could be changed for the better.
  • Recognize voting may be changed to make it more effective.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Develop a deeper understanding of who actually votes and why.

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Discuss the speaker’s general position on loss of trust based on the video and background content and develop possible solutions to issues the students may have with the speaker.
  • Group presentation of data found to answer each of the essential questions presented by the speaker.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, elearning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for elearning or distance learning

 

15-20 minutes

Watch Prince Zeid Ra’ad Zeid al-Hussein Doha Debates presentation and Speaker Spotlight. Write key points of the speaker’s videos.

 

20-40 minutes

Read the background content to develop a deeper understanding of speaker.

 

5-10 Minutes

In small groups discuss what each person drew from the videos and background information as key areas.

 

10-20 Minutes

Discuss each group’s findings as a class/learning group.

 

15-30 Minutes

Groups will pick three essential questions from the speaker and find additional data to better understand the question.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

One day

Students will form small groups. Each student in the group will ask 5 people (nonstudents outside of the school setting) the essential questions from this lesson. This may be done either in person or over Zoom, Skype, or other ways to connect digitally. Try to make connections with other people outside of your own town, State, or even country. The data will be gathered, analyzed, and then synthesized into a comprehensive summary of the data results. The results will be presented to the class.

 

One day

Have you registered to vote? If not, find out how to register to vote no matter where you live in the world. Check with your family and friends to see if they are registered to vote as well.

Zeid states that he believes it is vital for young people to vote and take on more leadership roles. What does the data say about these ideas? The Pew Research Center has asked these questions and found the answer. Explore the tables and graphs via the links below to get a better idea of what is really happen with young people and politics. Discuss what you find out with other students or even your family. Talk in person or virtually.

Defining generations: Where Millennials end and Generation Z begins

Gen Z, Millennials and Gen X outvoted older generations in 2018 midterms

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Background info: Prince Zeid Ra'ad Zeid Al-Hussein

About Prince Zeid Ra’ad Zeid Al-Hussein

Throughout his career, Prince Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein of Jordan has been an advocate for human rights and peace initiatives. His belief that “the safety of humanity will only be secured through vision, energy and generosity of spirit; through activism; through the struggle for greater freedom, in equality; and through justice,” has compelled him to engage in, and to lead the cause of humanitarian work including involvement in international criminal justice, UN peacekeeping, post- conflict peace-building, counter nuclear terrorism, and his pledge as an international gender champion.

In his final address as out-going United Nations Human Rights, al-Hussein shared his concern that the threat to global stability created by increasing nationalism poses great danger to democracy, and he advocated for world powers to fight against factions whose mission is to undermine civil liberties.

 

Prince Zeid’s key points from Doha Debates

  • The key to harmonious relationships is making small adjustments between individuals
  • We should consider other ideas but that does not mean we should adopt them
  • Harmony is difficult to achieve even in the most trusted networks (like families)
  • What would happen if all young people voted What if mandatory voting was universal
  • There should be a cap on the age of voting starting at 65 years of age
  • We need young, passionate voters
  • We need young people in leadership positions

 

Podcast

Former U.N. Human Rights Chief Outlines The State Of The Geopolitical Climate listen

Top diplomat Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein takes us inside the backrooms of global diplomacy listen

Food for Thought listen

 

Videos

World Leaders are Failing Human Rights. Here’s Why. watch on Youtube

A Conversation With Prince Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein watch on YouTube

Prosecuting Evil Q&A w/ Prince Zeid bin Ra’ad Zeid al- Hussein watch on YouTube

Switzerland: ‘Demonisation of the press is poisonous’ – UN Human Rights official on Trump watch on YouTube

Human Rights Is a Global Fight watch on YouTube

The Impossible Diplomacy of Human Rights watch on YouTube

Video address by Prince Zeid Ben Ra’ad Al Hussein, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights watch

 

Other

Twitter

Facebook

Lesson 5: Connector

Flexible instructions

This lesson and related activities are designed to support in-class learning, e-learning, and distance learning (students working online at home while the instructor checks in digitally).

Stage 1: Desired goals

Established goal

  • Explain the meaning and role of the majlis.
  • Describe and articulate the connections between differing views on trust.
  • Express the themes discussed during the majlis.

 

Meaning

Understandings

Students will understand that…

  • There are common connections in how to enhance trust in government.
  • Young people should become far more engaged in government.
  • It is necessary to create a system that is more inclusive of all people.
  • Government may not be able to stay in its current form.

 

Essential questions

  • What is a majlis?
  • What are drawbacks to randomly selected people working with people in positions of power?
  • How might change disempower people?
  • Why do you trust the people you do?
  • Where does change come from in society?
  • Is there a need for a intermediary position like that of the government?
  • What other forms of government could develop to create greater trust?
  • In what ways might technology lessen trust?

 

Acquisiton

Students will know…

  • Key facts about how the loss of trust in government is evolving.
  • The importance of resolving conflict between differing ideas and beliefs on the loss of trust in government.

 

Students will be able to…

  • Recognize differing views about loss of trust in government.
  • Express personal stance regarding loss of trust in government.
  • Use research skills to find information to support the student’s view about loss of trust.

 

Engagement

Studens will…

  • Understand the importance in human connections over time

Stage 2: Evidence & assessment

Assessment evidence / Performance tasks

  • Find data to support three of the essential questions discussed in the majlis.
  • Write a final paper on where the student stands with regard to capitalism with supporting resources and evidence.

Stage 3: Learning plan

In-class, e-learning, distance learning

note: pacing outlined below is for in-class learning and may need to be adjusted for e-learning or distance learning

 

5 minutes

Read about the Majlis being part of UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage.

 

5-10 minutes

Read “How a Majlis can open minds and shape our perspectives.”

 

5-10 minutes

Watch An Expert’s Guide to Getting Along to better understand the method the Connector uses to help people work together.

 

30 minutes+

Watch the Connector video. The second half of the full debate (starting at 22 minutes into the debate) may be used to better understand the consensus-building between the speakers.

 

One day+

The class/group is split into three groups. Each group is given two of the essential questions. The group will find information that supports and refutes the specific question. The class will come together to discuss what was learned based on the information that each group has found. This discussion will follow the Majlis format.

 

15-20 minutes

The class/learning group may watch additional sections of the full debate to listen to what each speaker talks about during the Majlis.

 

One day+

Each student will write a final paper on where they now stand on the issue of loss of trust.

 

Activities (choose one or more)

Variable

Loss of trust may develop from a loss of human connection. These Doha Debates episodes focused on the loss of trust in government. All three speakers made note of the importance of human connections and the building of trust. The greater the sense of trust the happier people will be throughout life. Human connections are a challenge in the best of times but COVID-19 truly changed how we connect. Watch What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness. Encourage other family and friends to watch it too. After you have watched the video, take time to connect with people in real time either in person or virtually. Go old school and take time to hand write a letter to someone.

Relative participants:

Toni Lane Casserly
American Entrepreneur
Brett Hennig
American Author and Co-Founder, Sortition Foundation